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History

M. Chohan / Wikimedia Commons

BAGHDAD — Islamic State militants hammered, bulldozed and ultimately blew up parts of the ancient Iraqi Assyrian city of Nimrud, destroying a site dating back to the 13th century B.C., an online militant video purportedly shows.

The destruction at Nimrud, located near the militant-held city of Mosul, came amid other attacks on antiquity carried out by the group now holding a third of Iraq and neighboring Syria in its self-declared caliphate.

The seven-minute video, posted late Saturday, shows bearded militants using sledgehammers, jackhammers and saws to take down huge alabaster reliefs depicting Assyrian kings and deities. A bulldozer brings down walls, while militants fill barrels with explosives and later destroy three separate areas of the site in massive explosions.

Eileen Pace

  

Bexar County Commissioners celebrated the grand re-opening of a historic courtroom Tuesday. The second-floor presiding court in the Bexar County Courthouse was restored to the original distinction it held in 1897.

The stately courtroom is again the largest in the historic courthouse, spanning two floors with a full-width second-story gallery where spectators can view the proceedings below.

PBS

Labor advocate and National Farm Workers Association co-founder, Dolores Huerta, has spent her adult life fighting for causes. 

Huerta is in San Antonio for the Briscoe Western Art Museum's Voices of The West Distingusihed Lecture Series. It starts at 6:30 p.m tonight at the museum's Jack Guenther Pavilion.

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