History | Texas Public Radio

History

The American wing of the Young Men's Christian Association — a worldwide organization founded in London in 1844 — launched the first basketball teams and group swim lessons in the U.S., popularized exercise classes and created the oldest summer camp still in operation, the YMCA's historians tell us.

wikicommons

Audie Murphy used to get as much fan mail as Rock Hudson, and now in his freshman classes at Baylor, David A. Smith is hard pressed to find two students that know who he was or why he was famous.

The star of Audie Murphy wasn't born on the big screen, but on the battlefields of Europe. Murphy, a diminutive boy of 17, lied about his age to join the Army--the only branch that would take him--and went on to become the most distinguished and decorated warrior of World War II. Pretty good for a poor Texas boy, who was the son of sharecroppers.

In this country, our founding fathers words are used by Republicans, Democrats, secessionists, progressives and domestic terrorists to justify their actions and positions. How is it that the same founder can be used on opposite sides of a single debate? 

David Sehat writes in his new book "The Jefferson Rule: How The Founding Fathers Have Become Infallible And Our Politics Inflexible" that we have elevated the founders to near deity status to the disservice of our national conversation and our civic life. 

Guest:

Susan Snow

The City of San Antonio and Bexar County have received word that the International Council on Monuments and Sites — or ICOMOS — has recommended to the World Heritage Committee this week that the San Antonio Missions should receive a World Heritage Designation.

An ICOMOS evaluator had come to San Antonio last fall to inspect the Missions’ site for authenticity and integrity. San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor said she learned of the recommendation just before the announcement became official on Monday.

Jo Ivester joins Texas Standard to talk about life in Mount Bayou, Mississippi, and what she learned through her mother’s work.

John Wilkes Booth was the man who pulled the trigger, capping off a coordinated plot to murder President Abraham Lincoln.

But historian Terry Alford, an expert on all things Booth, says that there's much more to Booth's life. His new biography, Fortune's Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth, delves deep into his life — before Booth went down in history as the man who assassinated a president.

M. Chohan / Wikimedia Commons

BAGHDAD — Islamic State militants hammered, bulldozed and ultimately blew up parts of the ancient Iraqi Assyrian city of Nimrud, destroying a site dating back to the 13th century B.C., an online militant video purportedly shows.

The destruction at Nimrud, located near the militant-held city of Mosul, came amid other attacks on antiquity carried out by the group now holding a third of Iraq and neighboring Syria in its self-declared caliphate.

The seven-minute video, posted late Saturday, shows bearded militants using sledgehammers, jackhammers and saws to take down huge alabaster reliefs depicting Assyrian kings and deities. A bulldozer brings down walls, while militants fill barrels with explosives and later destroy three separate areas of the site in massive explosions.

Eileen Pace

  

Bexar County Commissioners celebrated the grand re-opening of a historic courtroom Tuesday. The second-floor presiding court in the Bexar County Courthouse was restored to the original distinction it held in 1897.

The stately courtroom is again the largest in the historic courthouse, spanning two floors with a full-width second-story gallery where spectators can view the proceedings below.

PBS

Labor advocate and National Farm Workers Association co-founder, Dolores Huerta, has spent her adult life fighting for causes. 

Huerta is in San Antonio for the Briscoe Western Art Museum's Voices of The West Distingusihed Lecture Series. It starts at 6:30 p.m tonight at the museum's Jack Guenther Pavilion.

Pages