History | Texas Public Radio

History

Courtesy photo

Fifty years ago, a group of students at Texas State University took a stand against the war in Vietnam. The students, nicknamed the San Marcos 10, faced serious consequences for that stand. Their example and the consequences that followed still echo across college campuses today.

Ellen Schulz with her camera.
The Witte Museum

This fall marks 93 years since the Witte Museum first opened. San Antonio’s sprawling natural history museum has seen several iterations and huge growth, but largely lost in its evolution is the woman whose sheer determination created it.   


In Zero Tolerance, FRONTLINE examines how President Donald Trump turned immigration into a powerful political weapon that fueled division and violence.
REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Immigration reform has become a political weapon in contemporary American politics over the last six years. Controversial policies such as zero tolerance and — most recently — the third-country asylum rule have helped create a deep political divide throughout the country.


Pixabay CC0: http://bit.ly/2IV2xsz

The story of Texas is as vast and diverse as the state itself. Chronicling the state from its beginnings to modern day, Stephen Harringan writes about the triumphs, defeats, controversies and contradictions that molded Texas into the state we know today.


Courtesy of Brownsville Historical Association, Brownsville TX

Hateful language directed at people of color has a long, dirty history in the U.S. and along the border.

Mexicans and Mexican Texans living along the border in the 1800s were frequently described as greasers, monsters, demons, bandits, and criminals -- not just by Anglo Americans newly settled on the border but also by journalists who were telling faraway readers about the supposed lawlessness and backwardness of the borderlands. Just being Mexican could get you killed. That’s a fear many Hispanics have today, especially after the Aug. 3 mass shooting in El Paso.


Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is speaking to reporters after meeting with the House Democratic caucus.

There are growing calls for an impeachment inquiry following reports that President Trump pressed Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.

Courtesy Hotel Emma

One of the most popular hotels in the country is in San Antonio. It's named for a woman most people have never heard of. The woman behind the Hotel Emma ran a prominent brewery in South Texas for nearly two decades through some of the harshest times of the 20th century.

Nathan Cone / TPR

When you take your next vacation or business trip, and drop that coin in the hand of a cashier as you pay for your morning coffee, you might also be spreading the word about San Antonio without even realizing it.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Friends, family, colleagues and admirers celebrated the life and accomplishments of Lila Cockrell, the first woman to lead San Antonio and one of the first women to lead a major U.S. city. She died on Aug. 29 at age 97.

In July 1931, Texans were wondering if their state was going to war with Oklahoma. The two neighboring states were in a showdown over a bridge over the Red River. While many saw this Red River Bridge War as a farcical episode it was also a watershed moment in history.


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