Higher Education | Texas Public Radio

Higher Education

A sign on the campus of St. Philip's College, one of the five community colleges in the Alamo Colleges District.
File Photo | Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

The Alamo Colleges District is waiving tuition for some students this summer to keep them on track towards graduation during the coronavirus pandemic.

Students walk across the Trinity University campus on Feb. 6, 2018.
File Photo | Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Trinity University in San Antonio is launching a test-optional admissions policy in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Students will have the option to apply to the college without submitting an ACT or SAT score for the next three years, beginning with the Fall 2021 semester.

U.S. Census Bureau Director Steve Dillingham meets with UTSA students and officials Nov. 22, 2019.
Provided | UTSA

Colleges and universities rely heavily on federal funding distributed based on the census.  At the same time, college students have proven to be a challenging population to count.

Those two factors have inspired higher education institutions in San Antonio to work together to make sure their students are counted in the 2020 Census.

Seniors graduating in 2020 from select high schools in the San Antonio area will be the first students eligible to take advantage of a free college tuition program called Alamo Promise.

 

 

TEXAS grants are awarded to students  with financial need attending public universities like UTSA.
File Photo |Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

As the number of students eligible for the state’s largest financial aid program grows, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board is projecting a substantial drop in the percentage of eligible students who will receive the award.

Initial budget proposals filed in the Texas House and Senate this week keep funding flat for the Toward EXcellence, Access, & Success (TEXAS) Grant Program.


Pexels (Public Domain) http://bit.ly/2z1vOfy

Barriers in the U.S. education system make it less likely for students with disabilities to finish high school, enroll in college, or complete a bachelor's degree


Dave.see / http://bit.ly/2Qtu2Mb

A new study finds a San Antonio program designed to inspire Latino students to pursue doctoral degrees and to work in cancer research is having measurable success.


From Texas Standard.

Dr. Diana Natalicio has been called “the voice, the face, the strength and the sheer rock” of the University of Texas at El Paso. Now, after 45 years at the university and 30 years as its president, she has announced plans to retire.

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

State lawmakers learned Wednesday how Texas is struggling to help African American and Latino students secure college or career readiness degrees.


Mike Flores on the St.  Philip's College campus in March 2018. He is the incoming chancellor for the Alamo Colleges District.
File Photo | Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

When Mike Flores takes the helm of the Alamo Colleges District Oct. 1, he’ll be the district’s first Latino chancellor, and the first to be promoted from within.

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