hearing loss | Texas Public Radio

hearing loss

Our ears are complicated, delicate instruments that largely evolved in far quieter times than the age we currently inhabit — an early world without rock concerts, loud restaurants, power tools and earbuds.

Writer David Owen describes our current age as a "deafening" one, and in his new book, Volume Control, he explains how the loud noises we live with are harming our ears.

Clarissa Robles / Phipps Deacon Purnell PLLC

About twenty San Antonio veterans filed suit against 3M, maker of worker safety and healthcare products. The veterans said they suffered hearing damage during their service because of faulty earplugs made by the company. On Thursday, their attorneys announced the case on the steps of the John H. Wood, Jr. Federal Courthouse.

The settlement with earplug manufacturer 3M has focused attention on service-related hearing loss, one of the most common health problems among veterans.

A career in music can be hard on your ears — and the issue of hearing loss in the industry might be even worse for classical musicians.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with audiologist Marshall Chasin, who works with musicians who are losing their hearing. He says hearing loss among musicians is “very common, more common than one would think.”

The list of aging rock ‘n’ roll musicians who have damaged their hearing after a long career on stage is growing.

Huey Lewis and the News canceled its 2018 tour last week after Lewis told fans that he “can’t hear music well enough to sing.”

Eric Clapton told the BBC this year that he is going deaf.

Jiya Bavishi was born deaf. For five years, she couldn't hear and she couldn't speak at all. But when I first meet her, all she wants to do is say hello. The 6-year-old is bouncing around the room at her speech therapy session in Dallas. She's wearing a bright pink top; her tiny gold earrings flash as she waves her arms.

"Hi," she says, and then uses sign language to ask who I am and talk about the ice cream her father bought for her.

Sometimes I look at my husband and think, "I really don't remember what you just said." Is that because of his charming European accent, or because hey, we're married?

Don't leap to blame the accent, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis say. They are trying to figure out how the brain deals with foreign accents, hearing loss and other speed bumps on the road to understanding.