Health Care | Texas Public Radio

Health Care

Flickr user Adam Fagen (afagen) / cc

In the first segment:

Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood is headed back to court later this month over a 2011 law that excludes the group from being listed and funded by the state-run Texas Women’s Health Program.

In 2011 lawmakers at the state capitol along with Gov. Rick Perry set in place the laws that created the state-run Texas Women’s Health Program, which excluded groups like Planned Parenthood from being listed as a provider of women’s health because of their connection to abortion. 

rickperry.org

Despite a lack of direction from the Texas Legislature, the state’s leading doctor is optimistic about how Texas will function without having a plan to address Medicaid expansion.  

Dr. Kyle Janek is the commissioner for the Texas Health and Human Services Commission and will be the chief negotiator when the state begins discussions with federal government on whether to extend Texas a waiver and award the state a block grant to start a state-run form of Medicaid.

Flickr user Rob Chandanais (BlueRobot) / cc

A fact that is being overlooked as the IRS scandal plays out is that both conservative and progressive groups were required to answer additional questions. Two Texas groups talk about the extra questionnaire and why they feel they deserve to be tax free. Also on this show: In the last two years, 60 women's health clinics were forced to close, so why did the state have $2.3 million in unspent federal funds, which was available to keep clinics running?

Ryan Poppe / TPR

The group filing the federal lawsuit against U.S.Secretary of Health and Human Services Katheleen Sebelius and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Jacob Lew is headed by Houston Dr. Steven F. Hotze and the Braidwood Management Group, who both say small businesses will find ways around the provisions listed in the Affordable Care Act.

Ryan Poppe | Texas Public Radio

A bill requiring higher standards for abortion providers has made it out of the Senate Committee on Health and Human Services and is now on the senate floor for full review.

The discussion on the matter of requiring abortion providers to have a similar setup as surgical office quickly escalated from a civil conversation to a yelling match between the author of the bill, Sen. Bob Duell, R-Greenville, and Virginia Brawn, who owns a North Texas women's clinic.

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