Health Care | Texas Public Radio

Health Care

Tammy Fox wanted to help, after a friend took ill with a rare and difficult-to-diagnose autoimmune disorder that required many trips to the Mayo Clinic.

While Fox couldn't do anything medically, she knew there was a way to ease some of the burden of medical bills and costs associated with doctor visits. She turned to the website GoFundMe and set up a site for her friend.

"You've got meals; you've got hotel stays," she says. "And gas. So that all needed to be covered."

Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody, who is delighted by his ability to blow raspberries.

They also have a stack of medical bills that threatens to undermine it all.

In the months since their sturdy, brown-eyed boy was born, the Canos have acquired nearly $12,000 in medical debt — so much that they need a spreadsheet to track what they owe to hospitals and doctors.

Southside ISD spokesman Randy Escamilla helps students grab shovels for the ceremonial groundbreaking of a medical clinic next to the district's central office Nov. 5, 2018.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The Southside Independent School District is building a medical clinic next to the district’s central office.

At a groundbreaking ceremony Monday, school officials said the clinic will be free for the district’s more than 5,000 students. It will also be open to district staff and community members.


From Texas Standard:

You’ve heard of minimally invasive surgery – it’s often called laparoscopic surgery. Instead of making a large cut in a patient, and moving tissues and organs that are in the way, doctors make smaller cuts and focus on just the area they need to with the help of a tiny camera.

From Texas Standard:

The system of small hospitals that provides emergency and other health care to millions of rural Texans is in trouble. As many as 18 rural hospitals in Texas have closed since 2013, and many more may be on the verge. These closures can devastate local economies and leave some of the most vulnerable Texans with few health care options.

Long before he began studying for a career in health care, Marlon Munoz performed one of the most sensitive roles in the field: delivering diagnoses to patients.

As an informal interpreter between English-speaking doctors and his Spanish-speaking family and friends, Munoz knew well the burden that comes with the job. He still becomes emotional when he remembers having to tell his wife, Aibi Perez, she had breast cancer.

From Texas Standard.

One of the burdens of a serious health condition, like cancer or a chronic immune disease, is the heavy medication necessary for treatment. The cost of one day’s medicine can be surprisingly expensive, and that doesn’t take into account the physical toll and side effects that the drugs can have on one’s body.

From Texas Standard.

Whenever there’s a medical emergency the very first thing on one’s mind – especially if they’re insured – isn’t typically how much the bill could be. It’s to get help as quickly as possible, then deal with the cost later.

BRANDON QUESTER / INEWSOURCE

This week on Fronteras:

  • “Promotoras” initiative to help some San Antonio families on the west side reduce incidents of child abuse.
  • New Mexico aims to get more students of color into nursing programs (8:19).
  • A modern day vigilante stands guard on his property along the U.S./Mexico border (12:08).
  • A Dallas artist takes a whack at gentrification with a Latin party favor (16:14).


Mallory Falk

This week on Fronteras:

  • Rural West Texans scramble to try to find affordable health care. 
  • Border Patrol finds Guatemalans freezing at border (4:54). 
  • The Los Angeles Times uncovers corruption in Mexico’s housing developments (5:47). 
  • At a border reunion, a 14-year old boy gets an endearing birthday present (15:46).


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