Health Care | Texas Public Radio

Health Care

From Texas Standard:

Johns Hopkins University researchers recently analyzed hospital fees nationwide and found that Texas had the country’s highest health care markup ratio. Those ratios were highest in Brownsville-Harlingen, Laredo and El Paso. A markup ratio is what a hospital charges for a service, compared to the Medicare "allowable amount" – the rate that the federal government determines a service is worth.

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Health care is a top issue for voters and continues to be a prominent talking point for politicians. What are the basic tenets of various health care policies and proposed changes to the status quo?


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Millions of people gained healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act, but the law has faced a litany of challenges since its inception. What is the current legal standing of the ACA? Why has healthcare become a partisan issue?


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Four in 10 insured American adults say they have dealt with an unexpected medical bill.

Many were shocked to find out they owed thousands of dollars after receiving care at a facility or from a provider they assumed was in-network.

  

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Cyber criminals stole the health records of more than 9 million Americans last year, according to data from U.S. Health and Human Services. The data collected includes breaches from hospitals, health insurers and other health organizations covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which makes breaches public when they affect more than 500 people.

From Texas Standard:

As the 2019 legislative session continues, Texas Standard is talking with members about some of the bills they’ve filed, and what they hope their legislation will accomplish.

State Rep. Donna Howard, D-Austin, filed HB 311, which would exempt feminine hygiene products from state sales tax.

A bipartisan group of Texas lawmakers announced plans this week to address surprise medical bills in a way they believe would ease the burden on patients in the state.

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Tuesday at noon on "The Source" — A recent Trump administration proposal would eliminate secretly negotiated rebates between drugmakers and pharmacy benefit managers – a major shift that could affect prescription drug pricing for Medicare and Medicaid. 


Tammy Fox wanted to help, after a friend took ill with a rare and difficult-to-diagnose autoimmune disorder that required many trips to the Mayo Clinic.

While Fox couldn't do anything medically, she knew there was a way to ease some of the burden of medical bills and costs associated with doctor visits. She turned to the website GoFundMe and set up a site for her friend.

"You've got meals; you've got hotel stays," she says. "And gas. So that all needed to be covered."

Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody, who is delighted by his ability to blow raspberries.

They also have a stack of medical bills that threatens to undermine it all.

In the months since their sturdy, brown-eyed boy was born, the Canos have acquired nearly $12,000 in medical debt — so much that they need a spreadsheet to track what they owe to hospitals and doctors.

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