hacking | Texas Public Radio

hacking

Doctors watch an example of a medical cyber attack during the CyberMed Summit at the University of California-San Diego.
Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

When Jay Radcliffe hacked his own insulin pump on stage at the Black Hat cybersecurity conference in 2011, the room filled with applause.

Diagnosed with type one diabetes at age 22, he had just demonstrated how a bad guy could really mess him up.

“You could give me insulin right now, without my authority,” he said from the stage. 


pixabay CC0: http://bit.ly/2Gu0nz6

UTSA’s National Security Collaboration Center will focus on positioning San Antonio as a major player in cyber advancement under the direction of one of the country's foremost leaders for national security and cyber strategy, Brigadier General (Ret.) Guy Walsh.


Photos of travelers and their vehicle plates snapped at a U.S. border control point have been hacked, according to the Customs and Border Protection agency.

Customs officials said in a statement on Monday that the hack involves fewer than 100,000 people photographed inside vehicles — as well as images of the vehicle license plates — that were taken as travelers left the U.S. through specific lanes at a single, unspecified land-border crossing. The images were captured by CBP over a six-week period.

wikicommons

Cyber criminals stole the health records of more than 9 million Americans last year, according to data from U.S. Health and Human Services. The data collected includes breaches from hospitals, health insurers and other health organizations covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, which makes breaches public when they affect more than 500 people.

From Texas Standard.

Hackers are a threat to credit card information, election data, and now – according to a report from iDefense, an arm of consulting group Accenture – they’ve come for the energy sector.

From Texas Standard.

Multiple school districts in north and northeast Texas were notified by the Texas Department of Agriculture recently that they were likely exposed to a data breach. The warning estimates that personal information of some 700 students across 39 districts could have been leaked when an employee’s state-issued laptop was hit with a ransomware attack.

From Texas Standard:

When it comes to casting your ballot at the voting booth, we hear this phrase a lot: “Make your vote count.” But in an age where cyberattacks seem to be happening every day around the globe, maybe we should head to the ballot box with another phrase in mind: “Make your vote safe.”

There's a decent chance you — or someone you know — just got an odd email inviting you to edit a document in Google Docs. The email could be from a stranger, a colleague or a friend, but it's addressed to a contact that boasts a whole string of H's in its name.

In other words, it looks a little something like this:

Or, if you're looking at the invite in Gmail, it likely looks more like this:

Either of these look familiar to you? Here's a handy tip: Don't open the link.

This has been updated at 10:00 pm ET with Clapper statement

President-elect Donald Trump denounced as "fake news" Wednesday reports that Russia had compromising information about him before the election.

He also acknowledged for the first time that Russia was behind the hacking of emails from the Democratic National Committee, although he seemed to couch it later in the news conference by saying it "could have been others."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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