guns | Texas Public Radio

guns

Carlos Morales/ Marfa Public Radio

Twenty-nine people died as a result of two mass shootings in Texas last month. What is the response from Texans and their political representatives? Will these latest violent episodes move the needle on gun policy?


Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke gave a staunch defense of his gun control plan during Thursday's Democratic presidential primary debate, saying that as president, he would prioritize mandatory buybacks of assault-style weapons.

Quoting the candidate's past comment about selling back AR-15s and AK-47s, moderator David Muir asked O'Rourke: "Are you proposing taking away their guns? And how would this work?"

O'Rourke answered, "Hell, yes, we're going to take your AR-15, your AK-47."

Here's more of what he said:

Flickr user David Trawin (trawin)

An initiative to reduce gun violence in Bexar County kicked off on Monday during a joint news conference of government leaders and community groups at the county courthouse.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. | The Texas Tribune

Two usual political allies — Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and the National Rifle Association — traded rhetorical blows Friday after Patrick continued to advocate for requiring background checks for stranger-to-stranger gun sales.

From Texas Standard:

Brooks Landgraf, who represents Odessa in the Texas House, says the last couple days have been “absolutely heartbreaking.” But, he says, he's also heartened by how people came together to show support for the victims of Saturday's mass shooting.

A gunman killed at least seven people and wounded more than 20 in Odessa and Midlands, Texas, over the weekend. While communities gathered to mourn the slain, loosened gun restrictions took effect in Texas on Monday.

Marfa Public Radio’s Carlos Morales (@celizario) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to discuss the latest.

Ryan Poppe

On Sept. 1, more than 800 new laws that passed in the last legislative session go into effect. Other laws signed by Gov. Greg Abbott went into effect immediately and some laws were written to start with the new year.  But most are kicking off at the start of September.


Everyone knows what a trumpet looks like: shiny brass. But the Instrument of Hope is mostly black.

Except for the lead pipe — the straight part that extends from the mouthpiece.

It's made of bullets.

"Bullets that were shot and fired out of a gun, cut up and pieced together," says Josh Landress, who made it.

Updated at 3:37 p.m. ET

After a mass shooting at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, that left 22 people dead, the company said it would remove from its stores all signs, displays or videos that depict violence in an internal memo.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

President Trump on Friday indicated that he supported new legislation on "intelligent" background checks for gun purchases after recent mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

"On background checks, we have tremendous support for really common-sense, sensible, important background checks," Trump told reporters at the White House.

The president said the issue "isn't a question of NRA, Republican or Democrat," and added that he had spoken with the head of the National Rifle Association.

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