Gerrymandering | Texas Public Radio

Gerrymandering

State of Texas District Viewer

Last August at a posh Austin hotel conference room the American Legislative Exchange Council held its annual meeting, and one of the topics tackled was called “How to Survive Redistricting.”

Discussed were the finer points in the redrawing of district lines. That outcome will impact every American after the 2021 redistricting showdown.

It’s likely that somewhere Democrats are holding similar sessions; and if they are not, then they are guilty of political malpractice.

Pixabay CC0: http://bit.ly/2khy139

Lawmakers get to redraw state and federal legislative district boundaries after every 10-year census count. A Texas redistricting committee is holding field hearings across the state ahead of 2021 mapmaking, including in San Antonio on Thursday.


David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

Texas begins redistricting in two years. The process will slice up Texas into political districts. When the districts are redrawn to benefit a particular party, it's called gerrymandering.  Some say it's time to finally end this particular political game.

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Rado

Texas begins redistricting in two years. The process will slice up the state into political districts. When the districts are redrawn to benefit a particular party, it's called gerrymandering. For some Texans, it's time to finally end that particular political game.

From Texas Standard:

2018 could shape up to be a big year in the fight over partisan and racial gerrymandering. Cases involving redistricting are on the docket in the Supreme Court as well as other federal courts. And if you've ever looked at a map of Texas congressional districts, you know these court decisions will have implications in the Lone Star State.

From Texas Standard.

Last August a panel of three federal judges ruled that Texas congressional and state house maps needed to be redrawn. The judges ruled the maps discriminate against voters of color. Now the nation’s highest court will hear the case.

Ryan Poppe

The State Capitol is a lot quieter now that the special session is over and it looks like it will stay that way for a while.  The Texas Attorney General’s office will not ask Gov. Greg Abbott for a second special session over the state’s redistricting fight.