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fracking

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

In the next two years voters will be deciding two propositions that take a percentage from the oil and gas tax money helping grow the state’s Rainy Day Fund. 

The first of those is up for a vote this November and would take $2 billion out of the fund to help pay for water projects. The second proposition, which will be on the 2014 ballot, will take $1 billion to fund transportation projects. 

rickperry.org

Gov. Rick Perry is joining oil, gas, economic, finance and energy experts in Dallas today for an energy conference to discuss ways America can continue its growth in oil and gas.

The goal of the conference, which is being hosted by the George W. Bush Institute, is:

"To determine the cost that misguided regulation imposes on growth and to suggest more sensible policies that could benefit America."

Josh Havens is with the governor’s office and said Perry's main talking point will be about how Texas achieved energy growth.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

Palo Alto College is taking its training for Eagle Ford Shale jobs to new levels by expanding its certification program into a full associate’s degree program.

The Alamo Colleges created the Alamo Academies to answer the demand by oil and gas exploration companies for more personnel who were trained on the high-tech equipment needed for the work. The certification courses quickly became popular.

Flickr user jwhippy / cc

Texas has a new Water Development Board and this week Gov. Rick Perry swore in three members of the newly-created agency that is tasked with finding new sources of water and funding various future water projects.

During the regular session, the Texas Legislature approved a bill that created Prop 6, which will go on the ballot this fall for voters to decide. The measure takes $2 billion out of the Rainy Day Fund to help set up the funding for the next 50 years of various private and public water projects.

UTSA

Texas is continuing to produce big numbers in crude oil and natural gas production. The Eagle Ford Shale and West Texas Permian Basin are out producing the high expectations of industry experts.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration released new U.S. crude oil production data for the month of May and Texas, the country's number one oil-producing state, continues to produce energy at a pace that experts are marveling at.

Mike Norton / Wikimedia Commons

An environmental group has released the results of a study that details the cost of the new oil boom known as “Fracking.”  Fracking extracts oil and gas from the ground by injecting well sites with a high-pressurized mixture of water, salts and chemicals (see above graphic).

Environment Texas chartered a study of how much fracking costs Texas landowners and cities in terms of damaged roads, contamination, and pollution.

"Texas’ financial insurance standards are inadequate,” explains Luke Metzger, director of Environment Texas.

Laurel Morales / Fronteras

Fronteras: People effected by the Arizona wildfire that killed 19 firefighters now wonder what kind of home they'll be returning to. A new report alleges that agricultural producers in New Mexico may be saving money by engaging in unethical and illegal pay practices. A look at workers compensation practices in the state’s dairy industry. County commissioners in Mora, New Mexico, have passed the nation's first county-wide ban on hydraulic natural gas fracking, citing water safety concerns.

South Texas Environmental Education and Research

A bill to ensuring that oil companies using fracking techniques are being held to environmental standards has passed out of the Natural Resources Committee and now heads to the House floor for a vote.

The gas boom in the Eagle Ford Shale has led to an economic boost for the area along with strained infrastructure, but the increase in business also means expensive equipment, and theft. The losses were causing so many problems for drilling operations that local police teamed with the FBI to form the Permian Basin Oilfield Task Force. In spite of their efforts, theft continues.

Several research teams have developed techniques like adding tiny fragments of rust (iron oxide) or synthetic DNA to the drilling fluid to make it easier to identify what drilling rig is responsible for contamination. This practice could help produce hard evidence in cases that are brought to court over natural gas drilling practices.

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