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fracking

U.S. Energy Information Administration

More than 600 South Texas business and community leaders are meeting in San Antonio this week for the third annual Eagle Ford Shale Consortium Conference.

The communities over the Eagle Ford Shale have come a long way since the first wells were drilled in 2008 and the first few years saw growth so rapid that residents could barely keep up.

Esperanza Peace and Justice Center

A new exhibit opens Friday combining art and fossil fuel extraction called Frackaso. The Esperanza Peace and Justice Center’s Marisol Cortez explained how it was named.

“In English it’s a play on fracas: a mess, a fracas. And in Spanish fracaso means an utter and abject failure,” Cortez said.

And then there’s fracking, which is the third and strongest meaning of this art show. The Esperanza sent out the word they wanted to do an exhibit with hydraulic fracturing as its muse, and people responded.   

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

Texas Matters: Texas has enjoyed cheap water for years, but it may not be that way for much longer as the days of relying on a single source for water are coming to a close. Desalinating salt water is expensive, but could help the state cope with water shortages. Also on this show: Lesser prairie chicken protection, fracking and cancer in Flower Mound, Texas.

The future landscape of water in Texas

Abrahm Lustgarten / ProPublica

A new investigative piece from ProPublica is shining a light on the decision made by Chesapeake Energy to reinterpret their contracts with landowners to pay far less, sometimes as much as 90 percent less.

Ryan Poppe/David Martin Davies / TPR News

Texas Matters: The addition of rocker/conservative-activist Ted Nugent to the campaigning in the race for governor only served to add fuel to an already blazing fire. More on opposition research and it's role in modern campaigning, and how hydraulic fracking in North Texas could play a role in the race for railroad commissioner. Also on this show: Air quality in the Eagle Ford Shale, and a look at the next generation of Texas oil field workers.

Environmental Protection Agency

In the first segment:

A loophole is letting hundreds of oil and gas companies emit a combined 8.5 million tons of toxic chemicals every year in America and they don’t have to tell the public anything about it.

A new report by the Environmental Integrity Project has highlighted industry in Texas as being THE biggest polluter of the eight states they investigated, noting nearly 100 individual facilities releasing 10,000 pounds of toxic chemicals each year.

State of Texas

The Texas Supreme Court heard oral arguments this week on whether an injection well company trespassed onto an East Texas rice farmers land when they deposited fracking waste water into a nearby property.

FPL Framing, Ltd., a rice farming company based in East Texas, has filed suit against Environmental Processing Systems, a company that disposes of the backwash that is a result of natural gas hydraulic fracking, and in this case is accused of migrating into a farm’s water supply on an adjacent property.

Mose Buchele for KUT

Texas Matters: Residents in North Texas are dealing with the increased frequency of small earthquakes that some people are linking to oil and gas drilling in the area. State Rep. Mike Villarreal talks about the possible conflict of interest with William White, who as chair of the Texas Finance Commission is also vice president of a payday loan company. Also on this show: Population growth in Texas and the Kallison ranching family.

Mike Norton / Wikimedia Commons

Texas Matters: The Environmental Protection Agency drew fire from gas interests and politicians in how it handled the case in Parker County, which is west of Fort Worth, but the new report finds the agency followed all laws and rules in the investigation. Also on this show: Oil lobby contests crude oil export policy, Texas Monthly's Bum Steer Award(s) and a holiday tamale making tradition.

The Fracking Water Games: Catching Fire

South Texas Environmental Education and Research

In the first segment:

As the United States becomes a net exporter of oil for the first time since 1995, the Eagle Ford Shale deposit hums away with activity. The environmental costs have been becoming better documented and one correlation becomes stronger and stronger -- the link between certain hydraulic fracturing disposal methods and earthquakes.

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