fracking | Texas Public Radio

fracking

Flickr user Daniel Foster / cc

A seismologist for the Texas Railroad Commission updated the Texas House Energy Resources Committee about the findings of a study on the number of earthquakes occurring near fracking injection well sites.

"Hello. Are you registered to vote in Colorado?"

It's a refrain many in the state have grown to loathe this summer — heard outside their favorite grocery store or shopping mall as signature gatherers race toward an Aug. 4 deadline to put four energy-related measures on the November ballot.

With two of those measures backed by environmentalists, and the other two by industry-supported groups, all of the energy talk is leading to confusion among potential voters.

Flickr user Paul Sullivan / cc

Transporting crude oil from areas booming with the hydraulic fracturing revolution relies heavily on railroads. Busier railroads means more derailments and more derailments with trains loaded with old cars filled with oil means more tragedies.

UTSA Institute for Economic Development

A new study by UTSA’s Institute for Economic Development shows a rapidly-rising economy is in store for the West Texas oil and gas play.

The largest oil production in Texas has always been in the Permian Basin, but with new hydraulic fracking technologies, more of the shale plays around the state are starting to get a piece of the pie. 

Landmark reforms that could lead to a deregulation of the Mexico oil industry has a Texas state lawmaker wanting to explore how the state could benefit.  

Early this year Mexico passed one set of reforms in regard to the country’s oil exploration and now the state-run oil company PEMEX is seeking investors and private companies with the skill to help extract one of the biggest oil reserves in the world.   

Environmental Protection Agency

Tomorrow morning the Texas Railroad Commission  considers whether or not a groundwater district has the standing to protest the permitting of waste water disposal wells. The commission is tasked with regulating the oil and gas industry.

Flickr user Daniel Foster / cc

The North Texas city of Denton sits atop one of the largest natural gas reserves and could become the first Texas city to ban hydraulic fracturing.

Opponents worry the process of extracting oil and gas is hazardous to residents' health and call it a violation of property rights.

Denton has had a temporary ban on fracking since 2012 but will consider permanently banning it in the next two months. Denton City council has the next 60 days to vote on the issue.

A Dallas jury recently awarded nearly $3 million to a family who said they were poisoned by a natural gas drilling operation near their North Texas ranch. The verdict, reached on April 22, is being called a landmark by opponents of the drilling technique, called hydraulic fracturing or "fracking."

A Texas family has been awarded $2.9 million in a lawsuit over personal injury and property damage related to fracking.

In 2008, the Parr family started having serious health issues. They sued Aruba Petroleum, which operates natural gas wells near their home.

The Parrs argue that the company’s activities created toxic air pollutants and diesel exhaust. Aruba says it met state regulations, and the company plans to appeal.

Eileen Pace

As activity and income from the Eagle Ford Shale continues to grow, affected communities are studying how to manage finite resources into the future.

Local and state leaders are planning for issues that could not be fully addressed during the boom that hit the area six years ago.  

South Texas counties successfully weathered transformational changes with the Eagle Ford. It’s no secret that incomes have skyrocketed.

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