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Actor Will Smith says at first he was conflicted about his latest movie, Concussion.

"I'm a football dad," he tells NPR's David Greene. "[I] grew up in Philly with my Eagles, and there was a part of me that did not want to be the guy who said playing football could cause brain damage."

ABC News

The former assistant John Jay football coach who ordered his players to blind side a referee during a game with Marble Falls pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor assault charge as per a plea agreement with the Burnet County Attorney's office.   

The Source: Going On Defense For Football

Dec 7, 2015
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Football has faced many scandals and controversies over the last few years. Thanks to issues like concussions, cheating, domestic violence, and racism, the all-American pastime has become a complicated game. 

Despite all of its problems, writer Gregg Easterbrook argues football should not be abandoned just yet. However, he isn't blinded by love of the game and suggests reforms before rejection, starting with limiting youth teams. 

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We know more than ever about concussions, the permanent brain damage of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the other physical risks of football.

Yet so far this year, at least 19 students have died playing football, according to the University of North Carolina's National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research.

Though participation is slowly declining, football is still the country's most popular high school sport. Over a million high schoolers played last season.

The Source: Is Fantasy Football Gambling?

Nov 18, 2015

The already popular online game fantasy football has grown in recent years, with an estimated 56 million playing this season. With this increase in players has also come an increase in scrutiny. DraftKings and FanDuel were recently investigated after one employee won big, possibly with insider information.

High School Football Deaths Raise Concerns

Nov 18, 2015

At least 11 high school football players have died this year, either from head or neck injuries or heat-related illnesses. The most recent was a 17-year-old football player in Silver Springs, Kansas, who collapsed on the field after scoring an extra point and could not be revived.

From Texas Standard:

A story about a protest on a campus a few states away could have implications for one of the biggest industries in Texas – college football. At the University of Missouri, there were protests going back to September against racism on campus, a social media campaign called Concerned Student 1950, and a hunger strike by a graduate student. But most folks outside of Missouri did not know about any of this until last weekend.

From Texas Standard:

If you're naming off great sports films, "Rudy" and "Hoosiers" are probably high on that list.

A new film called "My All American" is coming out this fall. Written by the same screenwriter of those films, Angelo Pizzo, this time his focus is Texas football – more specifically Freddie Steinmark.


This September alone, three high school football players died after injuries sustained on the field. The latest, a 17-year-old quarterback from New Jersey, suffered a ruptured spleen during a game just over a week ago.

In some high schools across the U.S., deaths such as these — and an increased focus on the risk of head injury and concussions — have raised concerns among parents and diminished interest in the sport. At others, like the Maplewood Richmond Heights High School in suburban St. Louis, the football programs have disbanded altogether.

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