flooding | Texas Public Radio

flooding

From Texas Standard:

According to the latest predictions, Louisiana is likely to be hardest hit by a storm that could become a hurricane, if Tropical Storm Barry continues to gain strength. Luckily for Texas, the state likely won’t get much rain from that weather system. Nevertheless, it’s a good reminder for Texas to look at how well it’s prepared for the next major storm.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, flikr photographer Donna Burton / http://bit.ly/2Bxurr1

A bipartisan border security deal was approved Thursday evening by the U.S. House and Senate, but since funding for a border wall fell short of President Trump’s expectations, he declared a national emergency Friday to seek funds elsewhere. But the ongoing controversy over a physical barrier persists.

Reporter Melissa del Bosque exposed an environmental threat in her Type Investigations article.


Jack Morgan

The ongoing effects of the Llano River flood, Hurricane Harvey, the Blanco River flood of 2015, and flooding across the state over the past several years have caused loss of life and immense property damage.

As communities rebuild, questions about how we ensure the safety of all Texans remain.

From Texas Standard:

Many Texans are still feeling the effects of heavy rains this fall. In the Hill Country, places like Kingsland and Marble Falls are picking up the pieces after the Llano River breached its banks. The city of Austin is in the midst of a full-scale review into why its water treatment system was overwhelmed for nearly a week. And then there’s Sonora, a town of about 2,700 people an hour south of San Angelo which was hit by a catastrophic flood just over a month ago.

Heavy rains in central Texas have caused historic flooding this week. Gov. Greg Abbott has issued a state of emergency in 18 counties, and flooding has damaged homes in Highland Lakes and washed out a bridge in Kingsland.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd talks with KUT reporter Mose Buchele (@MoseBuchele).

From Texas Standard:

Sonora is a place most people only encounter on their way to someplace else. It’s located along Interstate 10, 170 miles west of San Antonio and nearly 400 miles east of El Paso. The town of about 3,000 people is the kind of place that’s rarely in the news. But like a lot of other things in Sonora, that changed on Friday, with an unexpected and catastrophic flood.

From Texas Standard.

Residents living in the Rio Grande Valley have experienced several days of heavy rains this week, which have overwhelmed cities like McAllen and Weslaco.

Bureaucracy And Old Data Hobble FEMA Flood Maps

Mar 8, 2018

From Texas Standard:

Since Hurricane Harvey, questions have been raised about why so many homes and businesses flooded in the first place. Now a peer-reviewed study in the journal, Environmental Research Letters suggests one possible answer: because the federal flood maps people have been relying on are wrong.  

From Texas Standard:

Sixty years ago, the Texas Water Development Board was tasked to learn about or manage everything being done across the state to meet our water needs. It was the dawn of an era of planning for water shortages.  

From Texas Standard:

A full account of the lessons learned from Hurricane Harvey is still being tallied. But at least one thing is certain: planners will have to rethink the concrete bones upon which Houston is built. And not just Houston, but any coastal city at risk of serious flooding.

For so long, the main strategy of such a metropolis has been to fight against incoming water with pavement and pumps. It appears the latest thinking on the subject flips things around – embrace the water, don’t just repel it.

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