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Film

Installation view of Joey Fauerso's video Teardowns for her current exhibition Teardowns at Blue Star Contemporary.
Jacqueline Saragoza McGilvray. Image courtesy of Blue Star Contemporary.

Enjoy some unique flamenco dance. Create your own Christmas ornament. And journey back in time with The Matrix. Your weekend is here, and there is plenty to do.  


Courtesy photo

Composer John Lunn didn’t start writing music for films and television programs until he was 32. Two decades after he began that journey, American audiences fell in love with the Crawleys – and Lunn’s memorable themes – from “Downton Abbey,” the ITV/PBS program that follows an aristocratic family through the first decades of the 20th century.

Good morning from Toronto, where the NPR Movies team has decamped for the next seven days or so, as we attend the Toronto International Film Festival, the largest film festival in North America.

wikicommons

Cinefestival, a San Antonio film tradition that embraces Latino culture, is back. 

Courtesy Melaneyes Media

Historical narratives often overlook the contributions of African Americans. The film “A Walk on the River- A Black History of the Alamo City” chronicles San Antonio's robust black history through interviews with historians, activists and private citizens.

Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

President Donald Trump has long touted the need for a U.S. southern border wall. The years-long debate has drawn comments from both sides of the aisle, as well as from the communities who call the international border home. But there’s more to the vast and diverse region than meets the eye.

Sam Peckinpah And The Making Of 'The Wild Bunch'

Apr 8, 2019
Wikimedia Commons

Texas-based author W.K. Stratton's latest book, "The Wild Bunch: Sam Peckinpah, a Revolution in Hollywood, and the Making of a Legendary Film" takes a new look at the making of a Hollywood classic from the volatile director Sam Peckinpah. The book goes into the backstory of the film, and its release and influence.

From Texas Standard:

Leslie Cochran was a man who experienced homelessness and often walked the streets of Austin in a thong and a feather boa. He became an unofficial symbol of the “Keep Austin Weird” slogan before his death in 2012.

Tracy Frazier directs a new film about Cochran's life, Becoming Leslie, which is premiering at South by Southwest.

In the early 1980s, actor Stephen Tobolowsky was living in Los Angeles with his girlfriend at the time, Beth Henley. Henley was hot off the success of winning a Pulitzer Prize for her play, “Crimes of the Heart.” The play’s success drew the attention of Hollywood, including director Jonathan Demme, who was looking for his next project after “Melvin and Howard.”

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