family violence | Texas Public Radio

family violence

Conditions created by the coronavirus pandemic can lead to more dangerous and frequent family violence and abuse. The method in place to protect the public from the COVID-19 threat is the same tactic predators and abusers often use to inflict harm: isolation. 


Approximately 1 in 11 female and 1 in 15 male high school students report having experienced physical dating violence in the last year. Young women ages 16 to 24 have the highest rate of reported abuse. 


Bexar County is seeing the emergence of more specialty courts that target specific populations and offer offenders a rehabilitative path forward.


Ring.com

An advocate for survivors of family violence praised a partnership between the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office and the San Antonio Police Department to give high tech doorbells to people at risk of being attacked.


Bonnie Petrie / Texas Public Radio

A judge and a San Antonio city councilmember, who is also a survivor of family violence, have teamed up to find the money to fund a drug court that will be the first of its kind in Texas. It’s part of an overall effort to make San Antonio a less violent place for women.

 


Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

Nearly 300 people packed into the sanctuary of a Mennonite church on San Antonio’s South Side to participate in a town hall exploring the reasons why the city is such a dangerous place for women.

 


Pexels CC0 http://bit.ly/2Hi9290

What's being done to identify and address the root causes of our city's challenges when it comes to community safety and family well-being?