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environment

From Texas Standard.

Global warming and climate change are two oft-used phrases in the conversation about energy production. Much of the time, scientists and reporters present the remedy as “green” energy, such as solar or wind. But there’s a lot we still don’t know about the climate effects of these energy sources.

Texas leads the nation in wind energy production, so it makes sense that researchers from New York would turn to the Lone Star State to study how wind power affects local climates.

From Texas Standard:

Anglers come from all over the world to fish Lake Fork, a 27,000-acre lake in east Texas with a reputation for producing monster fish. And in their quest to land a lunker, those fishermen also sustain the local economy. Which is why a new species in the lake has caused quite a bit of concern. And it’s not a species of fish, but a plant – an invasive floating fern called giant salvinia.

SAWS

The San Antonio Water System is stepping up enforcement since levels at the Edwards Aquifer test well triggered Stage 1 Watering Restrictions several weeks ago. 

Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio City Council has approved participating in the Paris Climate Agreement.  In a 9-1 vote, San Antonio now joins 300 other cities in upholding the provisions of the accord.  

Accepting the Paris Climate Agreement is one of the first statements made by the new council. Mayor Ron Nirenberg says it sets the stage for future policy.

“Under the Obama Administration we decided that cities need to lead on climate issues and we sent mayors all around the country to Paris to come up with this accord,” Nirenberg said.

Editor's Note: This story was originally published in December 2015 and was republished with minor updates ahead of President Trump's decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement. Some of the information on approval by individual governments has been changed to reflect changes in status.

It’s still a long time before the congressional midterm elections in November 2018. But a lot of candidates are already showing interest in running. And many of them are embracing an environmental message that, traditionally, has been kept on the sidelines.

President Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday that takes aim at a number of his predecessor's climate policies.

The wide-ranging order seeks to undo the centerpiece of former President Obama's environmental legacy and national efforts to address climate change.

It could also jeopardize America's current role in international efforts to confront climate change.

In a symbolic gesture, Trump signed the document at the headquarters of Environmental Protection Agency.

Wikimedia Commons http://bit.ly/2mAg9jW

For years, San Antonio and its surrounding areas have been bordering on failure to meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

A new report on local ozone levels weighs the potential economic costs if counties in the San Antonio area were to exceed these requirements, reaching what is called "nonattainment" status as decided by the Environment Protection Agency.

From Texas StandardJason Fry is a filmmaker from Brownsville. We met at a diner there. He told me what happened to him the afternoon of Dec. 8 as he drove down Highway 48, from Brownsville to Port Isabel.

“It was low visibility, and all of a sudden a pelican dropped out of the sky right in front of my truck,” he said.

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