environment | Texas Public Radio

environment

Steven Schauer

“So many folks locally, and worldwide, only know the San Antonio River Walk. I was really trying to look for and capture those interesting things that might tell a bigger deeper story about the river,” explains Steven Schauer.

The largest habitat for life on Earth is the deep ocean. It's home to everything from jellyfish to giant bluefin tuna. But the deep ocean is being invaded by tiny pieces of plastic — plastic that people thought was mostly floating at the surface, and in amounts they never imagined.

Brian Kirkpatrick | Texas Public Radio

A big home development on Boerne Lake faced opposition from concerned residents who live around the lake, a key source of water for the city.

Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

President Donald Trump has long touted the need for a U.S. southern border wall. The years-long debate has drawn comments from both sides of the aisle, as well as from the communities who call the international border home. But there’s more to the vast and diverse region than meets the eye.

Hodag/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://bit.ly/2ufybcC

Palm oil is one of the most-traded commodities in the global economy and tropical countries around the world are working to meet the growing demand. What are the pros and cons of harvesting and consuming this ubiquitous crop? 


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Public input on SA Climate Ready, the city of San Antonio’s proposed climate action plan, is underway.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, flikr photographer Donna Burton / http://bit.ly/2Bxurr1

A bipartisan border security deal was approved Thursday evening by the U.S. House and Senate, but since funding for a border wall fell short of President Trump’s expectations, he declared a national emergency Friday to seek funds elsewhere. But the ongoing controversy over a physical barrier persists.

Reporter Melissa del Bosque exposed an environmental threat in her Type Investigations article.


From Texas Standard:

A somewhat old idea to address climate change is getting new life, now that it appears to have the backing of New York freshman Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. She and other progressives are pushing an idea called a "green new deal" – riffing on the title of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's plan to rescue the U.S. from the Great Depression.

Writing for The New York Times, Thomas Friedman used the phrase "green new deal" as early as 2007, to advocate transitioning to an economy based on renewable energy instead of fossil fuels. Among the proposals from today's green new dealers is legislation calling for the country to transition to using 100 percent renewable sources of energy over the next 10 years.

The editorial board of the Houston Chronicle argues this isn't a radical plan, and would be a natural one for Texas. Harold Jackson is a member of the board. He says that in addition to abundant oil and gas, Texas also has a lot of capacity to produce solar and wind energy.

Carl Attard/Pexels http://bit.ly/2pr0q5V

Cities around the country have been working to diversify their "energy mix" – the combination of natural resources and technologies used to fuel power grids.


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

A proposed limestone rock quarry in Comal County worries some residents who live near the site. They discussed their fear the quarry could compromise air and water quality and heavy trucks could damage roads during a public comment meeting Tuesday night at the New Braunfels convention center, which attracted over 400 people.

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