Elections | Texas Public Radio

Elections

H. Michael Karshis CC By 2.0 : http://bit.ly/2Y4mHJH

Latinos will make up the largest minority voting group in 2020. What can the history and rise of the Latino vote tell us about the changing U.S. political landscape?

  

Raul Luna CC0: http://bit.ly/2XolAVo

Throughout the history of U.S. politics, music has been used as a rallying cry, a unifying message and most potently, a call-to-arms for voters. Essentially, presidential campaign songs are the commercial jingles for the most important product being sold to the American public.

LIFE Magazine

A lawsuit against the Texas Secretary of State David Whitley was recently settled after his office released a list of 95,000 voters accused of being non-citizens. Latino voters who were on the list and several civil rights organizations filed the suit, including the Southwest Voter Registration Project.

Flickr/SalFalko (CC BY-NC 2.0) http://bit.ly/2HJ1qxP

Texas is one of nine states that picks district court judges with a party ticket vote. And Texas is only one of six states that also selects the justices on its supreme courts and appellate courts with partisan elections. Is there a better way to pick a Texas judge? Some legislators may try to offer new ideas to address that old question.

From Texas Standard:

This political season in Texas, yard signs have been at the center of stories that sound straight out of The Onion. There’s the couple who turned their front lawn into a giant, hand-painted Beto O’Rourke sign. Or the anti-Brett Kavanaugh sign in Hamilton that police threatened to confiscate after Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller posted about it on Facebook. Our Texas Decides series continues with a listener question you might call a sign of the times.

From Texas Standard:

There’s a question that moves in parallel with the increased use of computerized voting machines – can your vote be hacked? It’s a question that was put to the test in the 2016 presidential election cycle, when Russia was found to be influencing voters in the election, but not the voting machines themselves. Some say the risk of vote-hacking could be reduced by using paper ballots in addition to electronic vote-counters.

Why Don’t We Vote In Runoff Elections?

May 24, 2018

From Texas Standard.

If you didn’t vote in this week’s primary runoff elections, you’re hardly alone. In fact, you are in the vast majority. According to the Texas Election Source, fewer than 1 million ballots were cast in both parties’ primary runoffs. For the Democrats, it was the lowest primary runoff turnout with a governor’s race on the ballot in almost a century. The Texas Election Source reports the Republicans actually had one of the highest turnouts for a runoff election year, but the percentage of voter participation was still just around 3 percent.

From Texas Standard:

We now know that Texas is among the states whose election systems were compromised by Russian hackers before the 2016 elections. The fear is that it will happen again in 2018. On Tuesday, outgoing NSA Chief and head of the military's Cyber Command, Michael Rogers, testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee that the administration had given Rogers' agency no orders related to preventing further Russian meddling. But some states are denying that interference occurred, or that it was successful.

Campaign photos

Early voting is underway for Texas’ March 6 primaries, and the ballot is full of new political hopefuls — including some who tout their military experience.  

 


Courtesy Diana Arévalo (L) and Trey Martinez Fischer (R)

Texas Public Radio's "The Source" is hosting a series of forums with candidates leading up to the 2018 midterm elections. Early voting for the 2018 primary elections starts in two weeks on February 20. Primary Election Day is March 6. 


Pages