Edwards Aquifer | Texas Public Radio

Edwards Aquifer

The San Antonio City Council approved to give $25 million to residents in need on Thursday, April 23.
Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio's 1/8-cent sales tax currently goes to the Edwards Aquifer, but the deal is set to expire this year. Prior to COVID-19 and subsequent economic fallout, Mayor Ron Nirenberg wanted to reallocate that portion of the tax for transit initiatives, pending voter approval. 


Charles Pecce, 70, and wife Sharon Pecce, 76, clear debris after returning to their destroyed home in the aftermath of Hurricane Hanna in Port Mansfield, Texas, U.S., July 26, 2020.
Adrees Latif | REUTERS

A South Texas region exhausted by a months-long struggle with COVID-19, drought and economic distress now marshaled its resources to endure one more massive challenge: Hanna, the first Atlantic hurricane of 2020. The cyclone made two landfalls Saturday evening and spent the weekend tormenting the region with damaging winds, torrential rains and widespread flooding.

Gov. Greg Abbott issued a disaster declaration on Saturday for 32 counties affected by Hanna, including Bexar County.

JJ Harrison / Wikimedia Commons

The Texas summer of 2020 took a turn for the worse this week. Triple-digit temperatures throughout the weekend scorched the San Antonio region and forced officials in San Antonio and New Braunfels to issue drought restrictions.

Courtesy VIA Metropolitan Transit

The City of San Antonio is expected to phase out a long-standing sales tax that funds land purchases in the Edwards Aquifer Recharge Zone in order to fund a portion of the ConnectSA transportation plan.


A file photo of a VIA bus in San Antonio.
Ryan Loyd | Texas Public Radio

Current funding for the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program could change hands from the City to San Antonio Water System as early as next month.


Steve Johnson CC0: http://bit.ly/2kiFWxf

More hot and dry days, aging infrastructure and population growth are all factors in the state of water in and around San Antonio. How are area water agencies working to ensure sustainable, accessible water resources for the future?


Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Jessica Quintanilla, a hydrologist for the Edwards Aquifer Authority, sloshes back onto shore in her black waterproof boots from the middle of this creek just off Scenic Loop Road, south of Grey Forest.

“Next, we have to set up the peristaltic pump,” she said, as she inserts the white, quarter-inch tube she dragged 15 feet back to shore from her water sensor, before flipping on a generator and starting the pump.


SAWS

The San Antonio Water System is stepping up enforcement since levels at the Edwards Aquifer test well triggered Stage 1 Watering Restrictions several weeks ago. 

Every summer there is a drop in the water level of the Edwards Aquifer. This is one of the most prolific artesian aquifers in the world. It is the main source of drinking water for San Antonio and over two million people.

But when the water level drops too low springs in Central Texas stop flowing.

And the aquifer is about at the point for one special spring that has cultural, historical and spiritual significance.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Water System officially opened on Friday its desalination plant that will pull water from the salty Wilcox Aquifer. It’s one of the largest inland desalination plants in the country.

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