Education | Texas Public Radio

Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Edgewood mariachi students perform in the lobby  of the district's performing  arts theater before its first State of the District April 11, 2019.
File Photo | Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The Edgewood school district wants to convert many of its neighborhood campuses to specialty schools over the next five years. Superintendent Eduardo Hernández introduced the plan Thursday during the district’s first State of the District presentation.

Texas Tech University's medical school has agreed to end its consideration of race in selecting candidates for admission, an outcome actively sought by the Trump administration.

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center submitted to pressure from the Education Department's Office on Civil Rights, which had conducted a 14-year probe into the use of affirmative action in admission policies at the medical school. The agreement is the first reached by the administration and a school to stop using race as an admissions factor.

The former UT Austin men's tennis coach will plead guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud for receiving money to recruit an unqualified student to the university's tennis team in 2015, the Department of Justice said.

Michael Center was put on administrative leave the day he was indicted on two charges of mail fraud for accepting $60,000 personally in the scheme and was later fired. He also received $40,000 on behalf of the university's tennis program, authorities say.

Wes Scalf, 13, speaks to his mom, Lisa Scalf, in their home in February 2019.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

As the first wave of Texas students sit down to take the state standardized test this week, many parents, educators and lawmakers are wondering whether those tests are fair. Some are convinced the answer to that question is no.

A bulletin board at Tafolla Middle School in San Antonio ISD on Mar. 30, 2019..
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The school finance overhaul bill HB 3 would keep millions of dollars in local property tax in San Antonio area schools and add hundreds of dollars more per student in funding, according to district-level impact estimates released by the nonpartisan Legislative Budget Board on Monday.

Rob Sipes, who has a son at Jefferson HS and a daughter at YWLA, voices his support for letting nonprofits run his childrens' schools Mar. 25, 2019.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Last Monday, trustees for the San Antonio Independent School District approved contracts allowing outside organizations to oversee 18 schools. During the pivotal board meeting, district leaders emphasized that most parents and staff supported the decision, but parents didn’t vote on the contracts themselves.

From Texas Standard:

After over a year without a superintendent, Houston ISD seemed ready to name a finalist in their search on Monday. However, a state-appointed overseer called a halt to the process, and now the district is back to square one.

Republican leaders in Texas are pushing for a bill in the state legislature that could add $9 billion into public education spending. But the push for education reform is nothing new in Texas. Fifty years ago, a San Antonio father named Demetrio Rodriguez demanded fair education for his children, taking his fight all the way to the Supreme Court.

Eighth grader Miranda Martinez picks up her iPad at Harris Middle School Sept. 21, 2018.
Camille Phillips / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio ISD trustees unanimously approved contracts Monday night giving outside organizations the authority to manage 18 schools, including some of the district’s most successful specialty schools.

Students in Michelle Olivarri's third grade class celebrate getting the right answer on a computer game in January 2019.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

As a master teacher at the San Antonio Independent School District, Michelle Olivarri gets a $15,000 stipend to teach at a school with a history of low student outcomes.

During a reading lesson in her third grade classroom earlier this semester, sounds of excitement blended with energetic music from a computer game on the parts of a story.

“I’m in second,” shouted one student after filling in his answer on a tablet.

“I’m in fourth,” said another. “Ms. Olivarri, I was on fire!”


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