Education | Texas Public Radio

Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

The sunrise in rural central Michigan reveals a landscape of neatly divided cornfields crossed by ditches and wooded creeks. But few of the sleepy teenagers on the school bus from Maple Valley Junior-Senior High School likely noticed this scene on their hour drive to Grand Rapids.

They set out from their tiny school district of about 1,000 students, heading to the closest big city for a college recruiting fair. About 151 colleges and universities were waiting.

From Texas Standard:

The Texas Senate Committee on Finance held a public hearing Monday to discuss a bill that would give a $5,000 pay raise to full-time teachers across the state. But before it passed in the committee, there was pushback from a group of school professionals who testified the bill’s definition of “full-time teacher” wasn’t adequate.

 

Students climb the stairs of the Chance Academic Center on the San Antonio College campus in June, 2018.
File Photo |Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Starting this fall, owing the Alamo Colleges a small amount of money will no longer prevent former students from re-enrolling to complete their degree.

Why The STAAR Test May Be Setting Students Up To Fail

Feb 22, 2019

From Texas Standard:

From botched distribution of exams to concerns about so-called teaching to the test, educators and parents alike have been critical of the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, or STAAR, standardized tests since their rollout in 2012. And over the past few years, something unusual has been happening: students who are otherwise successful in the classroom are failing the exams.

Pre-K 4 SA speaks to parents at Gardendale Elementary during an information night in January 2019.
Contributed photo/Pre-K 4 SA

Starting next school year, the city’s preschool program will operate an early education center in the Edgewood Independent School District.

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The Judson Independent School District has adopted a new staffing model to help cut its budget. Trustees approved a plan Tuesday evening that reduces the number of librarians and registered nurses assigned to each campus.

From Texas Standard:

As Texas lawmakers begin tackling one of this session's top legislative priorities – school finance reform – a state Senate measure proposes giving public-school teachers a raise. How much money is on the table and what difference would it make for teachers living paycheck to paycheck? It depends on whom you ask and where you live.

The board of South San ISD is developing plans to open Athens Elementary, which closed in 2017.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Administrators at the South San Antonio Independent School District estimate that it will cost nearly $14 million dollars to reopen Athens Elementary, Kazen Middle School and West Campus High School next fall. But the majority on the board is skeptical that it will cost that much.

File Photo | Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

During a presentation to business leaders Wednesday, San Antonio Independent School District Superintendent Pedro Martinez made a point to respond to critics and praise the district’s board of trustees. 

Gates Elementary teacher Kayla John laughs at a drawing a student drew of her during guided reading in January 2019. San Antonio ISD pays her an extra $15,000 stipend as a master teacher.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Four years ago, Gates Elementary on San Antonio’s east side was on the state’s list of failing schools. Only 15 percent of its students were reading at grade level.

Now Gates is one of the fastest improving campuses in the San Antonio Independent School District. School officials credit its success in part to teachers like Kayla John.


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