Education | Texas Public Radio

Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio. Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Some Mississippi parents are learning a new routine when they drop their kids off at day care centers that are taking part in a new pilot program aimed at combating fraud and saving the state money.

Under the program, the state scans parents' fingerprints to capture biometric information, and that information is turned into a number. Then, at a day care center, parents dropping off or picking up their kids put their fingers on a pad, and a small keyboard records the exact time a child is checked in or out.

Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

City staff members are busy putting together the program that will offer full day pre-kindergarten to thousands of four year olds next year.

The building selections are underway that will serve as the model education centers, the finances are being worked out, and perhaps the most important task is assembling the board that will oversee the program.

At Thursday’s city council meeting, Mayor Julián Castro said San Antonio is doing something it has never done before.

Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

City leaders are moving quickly on the plan proposed by Mayor Julián Castro that will provide full day pre-K to thousands of the city’s four year olds.

Just one week after the election, the first two model education centers for Pre-K 4 SA have been identified for consideration.

As part of Virginia's waiver to opt out of mandates set out in the No Child Left Behind law, the state has created a controversial new set of education goals that are higher for white and Asian kids than for blacks, Latinos and students with disabilities.

Virginia Democratic state Sen. Donald McEachin first read about the state's new performance goals for schoolchildren in a newspaper editorial.

During a town hall meeting last year, the San Antonio Manufacturers Association discovered that local employers are in need of workers with technical skills.

Employers reported that more than 2,500 jobs go unfilled, so they turned to the Alamo Colleges, who are teaming up with Workforce Solutions in partnership with the San Antonio Manufacturers Association for the "Just in Time" program. Students participate in a 90-day class, with 30 days of on the job training.

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