Ebola | Texas Public Radio

Ebola

Dominic Anthony Walsh / Texas Public Radio

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak in Texas, healthcare workers have expressed concerns about the availability of personal protective equipment (PPE). Local governments have scrambled to put together contact tracing teams. Five years ago, one state senator tried to plan for a situation like the pandemic happening now.


Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Updated Jan. 18.

While public health experts are working furiously to quell the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, researchers in San Antonio have made a discovery that might be a key to improving treatment.


Texas Biomed

It's a tale of two diseases. Researchers at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute are trying to figure out if being infected with malaria can help a person infected with Ebola fight off the disease.


A new case of Ebola has emerged in an urban area of Democratic Republic of the Congo, a troubling development in the country's new outbreak of the contagious and often fatal virus. Until now, the outbreak had affected a rural area.

Dr. Oly Ilunga, Congo's minister of health, announced Wednesday that a suspected case was confirmed in Mbandaka, a city of about 1.2 million people, and the capital of the Équateur Province.

"We are moving to a new phase of the epidemic," Ilunga says.

At least one person has died of the Ebola virus in Democratic Republic of the Congo in recent weeks, according to the World Health Organization. WHO says tests reflected the disease's presence in the body of the victim — one of nine people in the remote northern corner of the country to contract hemorrhagic fever since April 22.

Three of them have died, though at this point, only one case has been confirmed by the country's National Institute of Biomedical Research as the Zaire strain of Ebola.

The Ebola virus doesn't always make people incredibly sick, and some people who are infected don't even know they have it, according to research published Tuesday in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

cdc.gov / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

After a case of Ebola in North Texas in 2014 took the life of a man and lead to the infection of two nurses who cared for him, the Texas Department of State Health Services wants to be prepared in the event of an infectious-disease outbreak.

State Health Services spokeswoman Christine Mann says A regional infectious-disease workshop is taking place this week in New Braunfels, according to State Health Services spokeswoman Christine Mann.

One day after the West Africa region that suffered a two-year Ebola epidemic was declared free of the deadly disease, Sierra Leone has confirmed another death from Ebola. The World Health Organization says there's still a risk of more flare-ups.

Officials are now trying to trace any contacts the person who died may have had, in a desperate attempt to cut short a potential new chain of transmission.

The World Health Organization announced Thursday that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa is over — for now.

For the first time since the outbreak began in December 2013, all three of the hardest-hit West African nations — Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone — have had zero reported cases of Ebola for 42 days in a row. That's equal to two full incubation cycles of the virus.

After twice being declared Ebola-free, Liberia is reporting new cases of the disease.

The first case that was confirmed, according to the World Health Organization, was a 10-year-old boy in the capital, Monrovia. He fell ill on Nov. 14, was hospitalized a few days later and confirmed as having Ebola Thursday.

It's still unclear how the boy became infected, says WHO's special representative on Ebola, Bruce Aylward.

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