drug cartels | Texas Public Radio

drug cartels

Mexico’s political history is one of upheaval. From the time the country declared its independence from Spain at the turn of the 19th century, to the Mexican Revolution that drove thousands of Mexicans to the U.S. in order to escape the conflict that cost over 1 million lives.

Today, the power struggle continues in a new form — one of assassinations, kidnappings and drug cartels that have shaped Mexico’s recent history.

Alex Aviña researches 20th century Mexico and is the author of Specters of Revolution:  Peasant Guerrillas in the Cold War Mexican Countryside.

At first glance, a video circulating on Mexican social media this month appears to show a boisterous unit of security forces. For more than two minutes, the camera pans across a line of masked men in combat fatigues, stretching down a rural road. Some stand beside armored vehicles painted in camouflage colors, firing military-grade weapons into the air. Others peer out of makeshift turrets atop the vehicles.

Earlier this month, Mexican officials discovered the body of a second murdered activist who worked at the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in the mountains of Michoacán.

Two days after drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán was transferred to a prison near Juárez, a Mexican city near the U.S. border, a federal judge in Mexico said the extradition process can move forward.

An unnamed judge said the "legal requirements laid out in the extradition treaty" between the U.S. and Mexico had been met, The Associated Press reports, adding that Mexico's foreign ministry has 20 days to approve the extradition.

Wikimedia Commons

    

“El Chapo” Captured – Will Drug Lord Be Tried In the U.S?

Nearly six months after his most recent escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico, drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán has been caught, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced via Twitter.

"Mission accomplished: we got him," Nieto wrote Friday afternoon, informing the public that El Chapo had been apprehended.

Three stories of the drug war are woven into a beautifully shot, well made documentary called Kingdom of Shadows. Grieving families, aging former traffickers, undercover law enforcement and crusading activists are all highlighted in a brutal war that has taken many lives. The movie charts the evolution of the illicit drug industry and the raging violence that has hit Mexico with full force. 

It screened at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center Nov 10th at 7:30 PM.

Observing the consequences of the Mexican drug trade on both sides of the U.S. border, Cartel Land toggles between Arizona and the state of Michoacan, about 1,000 miles to the south. Only the latter of the twinned storylines really pays off, but that one is riveting.

Forty-two suspected gang members and one Federal Police officer were killed in a shootout at a ranch in western Mexico that is being described as the deadliest such encounter in recent memory.

Heroin, today, is killing more and more people in rural America.

One Mexican cartel has seeded low-cost heroin around rural towns in the Southwest and Midwest, selling it cheap and easy, almost like pizza.

Madison, Neb. — population 2,500 — is just a speck of a town, a two-hour drive from the big-city bustle of Omaha. But it's not far enough away to avoid the growing impact of heroin.

"The world's gotten smaller," says Police Chief Rod Waterbury. "If drugs can make it to Chicago, they can make it here."

Pages