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drug cartels

Earlier this month, Mexican officials discovered the body of a second murdered activist who worked at the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in the mountains of Michoacán.

Two days after drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán was transferred to a prison near Juárez, a Mexican city near the U.S. border, a federal judge in Mexico said the extradition process can move forward.

An unnamed judge said the "legal requirements laid out in the extradition treaty" between the U.S. and Mexico had been met, The Associated Press reports, adding that Mexico's foreign ministry has 20 days to approve the extradition.

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“El Chapo” Captured – Will Drug Lord Be Tried In the U.S?

Nearly six months after his most recent escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico, drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán has been caught, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced via Twitter.

"Mission accomplished: we got him," Nieto wrote Friday afternoon, informing the public that El Chapo had been apprehended.

Three stories of the drug war are woven into a beautifully shot, well made documentary called Kingdom of Shadows. Grieving families, aging former traffickers, undercover law enforcement and crusading activists are all highlighted in a brutal war that has taken many lives. The movie charts the evolution of the illicit drug industry and the raging violence that has hit Mexico with full force. 

It screened at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center Nov 10th at 7:30 PM.

Observing the consequences of the Mexican drug trade on both sides of the U.S. border, Cartel Land toggles between Arizona and the state of Michoacan, about 1,000 miles to the south. Only the latter of the twinned storylines really pays off, but that one is riveting.

Forty-two suspected gang members and one Federal Police officer were killed in a shootout at a ranch in western Mexico that is being described as the deadliest such encounter in recent memory.

Heroin, today, is killing more and more people in rural America.

One Mexican cartel has seeded low-cost heroin around rural towns in the Southwest and Midwest, selling it cheap and easy, almost like pizza.

Madison, Neb. — population 2,500 — is just a speck of a town, a two-hour drive from the big-city bustle of Omaha. But it's not far enough away to avoid the growing impact of heroin.

"The world's gotten smaller," says Police Chief Rod Waterbury. "If drugs can make it to Chicago, they can make it here."

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CIUDAD VICTORIA, Mexico — An official says nine police officers were kidnapped by a criminal gang in northern Mexico and later rescued, though one was killed in the confrontation.

The officers from Nuevo Leon state were abducted when they pursued suspects into neighboring Tamaulipas, on the Texas border, Sunday night. They were following a vehicle carrying armed men. On a highway they encountered two other vehicles full of gunmen. One officer was killed, and the others kidnapped.

Courtesy The U.S. Air Force / Wikimedia Commons

AUSTIN — A former border security contractor in Texas says there was “spying on Mexico” during aerial surveillance missions and urged caution with state officials over that disclosure, though state security officials said the wording was a mischaracterization of the operation, a newspaper reported Monday.

The “spying” reference was contained in a November 2010 report to the Texas Department of Public Safety during a period of heightened border violence, and obtained by the Austin American-Statesman.

Abrams Learning and Information Systems, which the state hired in 2006 to bring military know-how to state border security efforts, told state officials in the memo that they “need to be careful here as we are admitting to spying on Mexico.”