Downtown San Antonio | Texas Public Radio

Downtown San Antonio

Michael Cirlos

A new art installation downtown grew out of some large black and white pictures by Michael Cirlos, extracted from his book Humans of San Antonio. It's in a spot that’s quite accessible but perhaps not in a place the public would normally visit.

San Antonio Book Festival

The San Antonio Book Festival returns in April for a seventh time and with a new executive director: Lilly Gonzalez succeeds festival founder Katy Flato. 

The Institute of Texan Cultures

The Institute of Texan Cultures prepares to take Texans on a delicious tour of the world this weekend.

 

Jo Ann Andera, the director of the Asian Festival, is excited at what the public will see.

 

"It's an incredible event, and it's an experience in color of costumes, incredible faces,” she said. “It's a great showcase of the diversity of our community."

Jennifer Ling Datchuk, Roshini Kempadoo and Sama Alshaibi. Artpace artists in residence.
Mark Menjivar/Roshini Kempadoo/Sama Alshaibi / Courtesy Photos

The residency program at Artpace, the museum Linda Pace created, has been a San Antonio institution.


Shervin Lainez / Contributed Photo

Youth Orchestras of San Antonio is teaming up with a genre-busting music group that has toured the world, has been featured with many orchestras and was the subject of an Emmy-winning PBS concert program, as well as NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert series: Time for Three.


Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

Updated Jan. 9.

Texas Public Radio and local businessman and philanthropist Guillermo Nicolas announced the station’s new headquarters will officially be named the Irma & Emilio Nicolas Media Center.


Sarah Brooke Lyons / Contributed Photo

It’s called DreamWeek and Shokare Nakpodia created the annual event seven years ago to honor the vision of Martin Luther King Jr.

But he says the non-profit event looks to expand on King’s vision.


Contributed photo / UTSA Libraries Special Collections at ITC

A photo exhibit at the Institute of Texan Cultures tracks San Antonio through a 130-year period.

 


Lauren Terrazas / Texas Public Radio

Some Hispanics of Mexican descent have never heard of Día de los Muertos — or they simply never cared about it when they were children.

But as adults, some have developed a new appreciation for this ancient holiday. And the perfect place to make those connections is a Día de los Muertos festival in downtown San Antonio.


Michael Barera / http://bit.ly/2OOgeP0

Barrio Laredito was established in what’s now downtown San Antonio, just west of San Pedro Creek. Though the small neighborhood disappeared due to gentrification in the 1970s, its nearly three-centuries-old culture lives on.

Binisa Zentella, a folklorist researching the music from Texas and its ties to Spain and Latin America, said the cultural resilience of Barrio Laredito allowed its residents to express themselves in a way that they couldn’t outside the neighborhood.

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