domestic violence | Texas Public Radio

domestic violence

Roberto Martinez

Almost overnight, "flatten the curve" became a national motto. This week on Petrie Dish, TPR's weekly podcast about the coronavirus, we unpack the origins of that phrase with a public health expert who helped popularize it. And, we hear from reporters across Texas about some of the negative consequences of quarantine, from a spike in domestic violence reports to the relocation of migrants in camps along the U.S.-Mexico border. 

Conditions created by the coronavirus pandemic can lead to more dangerous and frequent family violence and abuse. The method in place to protect the public from the COVID-19 threat is the same tactic predators and abusers often use to inflict harm: isolation. 


Yupa Watchanakit / Shutterstock

Things were bad for domestic violence survivors in San Antonio before the COVID-19 pandemic, but people are in more dire situations now. They’re stuck at home with their abusers, and they also face the stressors of financial insecurity and the fear of catching a potentially deadly virus.


Approximately 1 in 11 female and 1 in 15 male high school students report having experienced physical dating violence in the last year. Young women ages 16 to 24 have the highest rate of reported abuse. 


Bexar County is seeing the emergence of more specialty courts that target specific populations and offer offenders a rehabilitative path forward.


Ring.com

An advocate for survivors of family violence praised a partnership between the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office and the San Antonio Police Department to give high tech doorbells to people at risk of being attacked.


From Texas Standard:

The recent death of a Houston police officer reignited an aspect of the gun control debate that intersects with domestic violence.

Photo by Kat Jayne from Pexels CC0: http://bit.ly/2Pax9Kn

Homicides related to domestic violence in San Antonio have continued to rise over the past four years. At the end of October, City Council approved a comprehensive plan to disrupt the cycle of family and intimate partner violence.


Jonathan Ahl | The American Homefront Project

A recent report found that military law enforcement often mishandles domestic violence on base, leading to fewer prosecutions and ongoing danger for people who are abused. Some abused spouses complain that they’re not taken seriously and say the process favors the service member.


Left to Right: Bexar County Judges Peter Sakai and Monique Diaz, Assistant City Manager Colleen Bridger, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District Violence Prevention Manager Jenny Hixon
Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Love is.

That is the name of San Antonio’s comprehensive, five year plan to combat domestic violence.

Assistant City Manager Colleen Bridger presented the details of the first year of the plan to the city council on Wednesday.

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