Dolores Huerta | Texas Public Radio

Dolores Huerta

Courtesy of the Dolores Huerta Foundation

Labor leader and activist Dolores Huerta fought alongside Cesar Chavez to unionize farm workers, but her life in activism didn’t end at the picket line.

She continues to work for the working poor, women, and children, through the Dolores Huerta Foundation. Huerta was recently the guest of honor at an event hosted by the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

The name of Dolores Huerta is often spoken in the same breath as that of labor rights icon, Cesar Chavez. Huerta looks none of her 89 years. Wearing a bright red blazer and black pants, her diminutive figure was larger than life when she spoke to a sold out breakfast Tuesday for the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.


Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Changing The World.

About Dolores Huerta's TED Talk

As a lifelong activist, Dolores Huerta has learned how to use her voice to fight for social justice. She discusses the power that all of us have to demand justice and spark movements for change.

About Dolores Huerta

At 87, Dolores Huerta is a living civil rights icon. She has spent most of her life as a political activist, fighting for better working conditions for farmworkers and the rights of the downtrodden, a firm believer in the power of political organizing to effect change.

San Antonio celebrated Labor Day with a downtown march that remembered the 490 mile march that Texas farm workers completed 50 years ago.

The Labor Day procession began at San Fernando Cathedral and ended at downtown’s Milam Park. Hundreds gathered and chanted the same slogans that motivated striking farm workers 50 years ago.

On this Labor Day, a look back to 50 years ago – a labor fight, a strike and a legendary march for better wages, improved working conditions and human dignity for farm workers.

On June 1, 1966, farm workers in Starr County in the Rio Grande Valley, virtually all of them Latino, left the melon fields.

They did the unimaginable and went on strike.

They were demanding a $25 dollar-an-hour wage, and improved working conditions, including clean drinking water.