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documentary

Logic Allah

The weekend is here, and if you’re looking for some arts and culture ideas, you’ve come to the right place. You can catch a documentary on the Black experience and influences in San Antonio, hear a great classical music collaboration, and watch a Broadway musical about the Sept. 11 attacks.

 


Courtesy of Paul Sequiera

In late 1960s Chicago, disparate and diverse working-class political groups banded together to collectively push back against oppression, inequality, police brutality and poverty.


San Antonio Symphony

Two familiar faces come back to the San Antonio Symphony. Also, listen to a string quartet in a dive bar. And then take a cinematic journey with cowboys at the Briscoe Museum. Your weekend is here, and it's definitely interesting!


A largely-forgotten court case about race discrimination in Texas schools is brought to life in a documentary.

It’s been a personal journey for the film’s executive producer.


Greenwich Entertainment

In the 1970s, few female artists could draw a crowd—or the respect of fellow performers—like Linda Ronstadt.

In Zero Tolerance, FRONTLINE examines how President Donald Trump turned immigration into a powerful political weapon that fueled division and violence.
REUTERS/Tom Brenner

Immigration reform has become a political weapon in contemporary American politics over the last six years. Controversial policies such as zero tolerance and — most recently — the third-country asylum rule have helped create a deep political divide throughout the country.


Courtesy Melaneyes Media

Historical narratives often overlook the contributions of African Americans. The film “A Walk on the River- A Black History of the Alamo City” chronicles San Antonio's robust black history through interviews with historians, activists and private citizens.

Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes, a stylish and engaging new documentary by Sophie Huber, opens in the recording studio, with a top-tier crew of modern jazz musicians going about their business. From his station behind a keyboard rig, Robert Glasper calls out ideas for an arrangement; Ambrose Akinmusire's trumpet, warming up, can be heard in the background. An establishing shot introduces Don Was, the musical polymath serving as Blue Note's president, as a hipster Buddha in the control booth.

In the opening scene of Pavarotti, the new documentary by director Ron Howard, the popular tenor travels deep into the Amazon jungle in search of an old opera house where the great Enrico Caruso may have once sung.

The building is shuttered, but because he's Luciano Pavarotti the door is unlocked for him to belt out a few honeyed notes from the stage. His fabulous voice soars into the vast emptiness of the auditorium.

The Institute of Texan Cultures

On Fronteras:

  • San Antonio’s African-American history is often overshadowed by those who fought for Texas independence. Aundar Ma’at and Born Logic Allah are working to add to the narrative of the city’s history with their documentary, ‘Walk on the River: A Black History of the Alamo City’ (0:16).
  • And Texas Public Radio’s Ryan Poppe reports on one professor’s effort to identify and preserve historic black settlements (15:55).


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