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disease

The U.S. health care system could become overwhelmed by the influx of people infected with the coronavirus and its disease COVID-19 as soon as April 15, even with strong social distancing rules and other protective measures in place. 


The ongoing global pandemic has provoked an onslaught of misinformation, fraudulent behavior, conspiracy theories and anti-Asian rhetoric.


Texas Biomedical Research Institute

When most Americans think of tuberculosis, they think of it as an old disease that is no longer a threat. But, Texas Biomedical Research Institute President and CEO Dr. Larry Schlesinger says TB is still making people ill.


From Texas Standard:

Heavy rains capped by periods of hot muggy weather, spare tires holding standing water, mosquitoes and fleas carrying dangerous strains of diseases that threaten the local populace. You’re probably picturing the Philippines or maybe Haiti, but what if I told you this scene is right here in Texas?

For the first time in 90 years, U.S. health officials say they have diagnosed a case of the plague that may have spread in the air from one person to another. Don't be alarmed — the plague these days is treatable with antibiotics and is exceptionally rare (just 10 cases were reported nationwide in 2014).

And if the plague has become mostly a curiosity in the United States, this case is more curious than most.

We often think about people spreading diseases around the world. This spring, vacationers brought chikungunya from the Caribbean to the United States. Businessmen have likely spread Ebola across international borders in West Africa. And health care workers have carried a new virus from the Middle East to Asia and Europe.

But what about (wo)man's best friend?

NIAID / http://bit.ly/1oL0JnZ

An Iowa man who was sentenced to 25 years for not disclosing to a sexual partner his HIV-positive status had his sentence vacated last week.  

Nick Rhoades, who was 26 years old at the time, used a condom, was actively taking anti-viral drugs, and didn't transmit the disease to anyone, but the crime of criminal transmission of HIV in Iowa and many other states doesn't require you actually transmit.

Flickr user NIAID / cc

  Malaria killed 617,000 people in 2012, according to the World Health Organization. The mosquito-transmitted disease affects more than 207 million every year having a fast impact on the stability and productivity of affected societies. 

Research into the disease has reduced fatalites by almost half since 2000, but the variety of parasites that cause the disease make the treating of it more difficult, and the rise of drug-resistant malarial strains are on the rise.