diabetes | Texas Public Radio

diabetes

Latino immigrants in the U.S. say the quality and affordability of health care is better in the U.S. than in the countries they came from, according to the latest survey by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. But many report having health care problems.

When it comes to the rising prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, there are many factors to blame.

Diet and exercise sit somewhere at the top of the list. But the genes that some of us inherit from Mom and Dad also help determine whether we develop the disease, and how early it crops up.

Now an international team of scientists have identified mutations in a gene that suggests an explanation for why Latinos are almost twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as Caucasians and African-Americans.

Metropolitan Health District

The San Antonio Metropolitan Health District is partnering with the YMCA to bring diabetes education to the community, including a free diabetes management program developed by Stanford University.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 26 million people in the U.S. suffered from diabetes in 2010  and 79 million more had been diagnosed with pre-diabetes. Thirteen percent of Bexar County residents are diabetic.

During the Month of November, Metro Health and the YMCA of Greater San Antonio will offer free classes to help patients prevent and self-manage diabetes.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

A new study using San Antonio children shows that eating cereal with whole milk provides them with more nutrients and smaller waistlines as opposed to other breakfast foods.

The study used about 600 boys and girls from family incomes of less than $24,000 and followed them as they progressed from the fourth through the sixth grades. Every year it took 72 hours of a child’s diet to determine the effects of the different types of breakfast.

Pages