diabetes | Texas Public Radio

diabetes

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

A possible cure for diabetes is on the horizon for the millions of people who suffer from the disease. The important research is being conducted in San Antonio. The technique is designed to make the body produce insulin on its own again.

Diabetic patients have to use finger pricks to check blood sugar and insulin shots to control their glucose levels.

Elizabeth Allen / University Health System

You've probably heard about the large numbers of people in South Texas who suffer from diabetes. But what does it mean if you are diagnosed as pre-diabetes?

TPR's Bioscience Medicine reporter Wendy Rigby interviewed Curtis Triplitt, Pharm.D., a researcher at the Texas Diabetes Institute on San Antonio's West Side. This is a transcript of that interview:

Courtesy photo

The new director of the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, Dr. Colleen Bridger, is a nationally recognized speaker, trainer and innovations expert with over 20 years of experience in community development and improvement.

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More than one-third of Bexar County adults are obese, according to recent data, and obesity is a known risk factor for diabetes.

A widely used blood test to measure blood-sugar trends can give imprecise results, depending on a person's race and other factors. This test means diabetes can sometimes be misdiagnosed or managed poorly.

Doctors have been cautioned before that results from the A1C test don't have pinpoint accuracy. A study published Tuesday underscores that shortcoming as it applies to people who carry the sickle cell trait.

The Food and Drug Administration's approval of a new insulin delivery system for people with Type 1 diabetes is a big deal.

With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas makes little or no insulin so people have to replace it with either multiple daily injections or a pump. In either case, that process involves constant error-prone adjustments, particularly around food and exercise. Over the long term, high blood sugar levels can lead to organ damage, but over-correcting by giving more insulin can cause dangerous low blood sugars that can lead to unconsciousness.

Beatrice Sanchez and Mariana Arias drive around their city, Winston-Salem, N.C., in search of a very specific population of residents: Latinos with prediabetes.

The two women, both bilingual and Hispanic, are recruiting participants for a Type 2 diabetes prevention study called "La Comunidad," a lower-cost local version of the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program trial that staved off diabetes through changes in diet and physical activity in about 50 percent of study participants.

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Kurt Andersen, host of WNYC’s Studio 360, about his 2012 novel, “True Believers.”

Its main character struggles with Type 1 diabetes, as does Andersen. He talks about the challenges of dealing with his disease.

Read more and see listener comments from our original interview in 2012.

Now There's A Health Plan That Zeros In On Diabetes Care

Nov 17, 2015

Talk about targeted. Consumers scrolling through the health plan options on the insurance marketplaces in a few states this fall may come upon plans whose name — Leap Diabetes Plans — leaves no doubt about who should apply.

How Diabetes Can Lead To Depression

Nov 2, 2015

According to the American Diabetes Association, studies show people with diabetes have a greater risk of depression than those without.  

Dr. Rhonda Goen, a psychiatrist with Parkland Hospital System, explains.

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