diabetes | Texas Public Radio

diabetes

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

COVID-19 has taken a toll on minority and high-risk communities, especially those with underlying medical conditions. One of those conditions is diabetes.

Tracey D. Brown, President and CEO of the American Diabetes Association, explains having diabetes doesn’t necessarily make someone more susceptible to contracting the virus, but the recovery process is a steeper uphill battle for diabetics.

COVID-19 poses a more serious risk to people with underlying health conditions and chronic illnesses, including both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In Bexar County, the coronavirus pandemic is now layered on top of an existing disparity-and-diabetes crisis.


Norma Martinez | Texas Public Radio

More than 30 million Americans have diabetes, and there are probably millions more who have it and don’t know.

Latinos and African Americans are at a much higher risk for developing the disease than non-Hispanic whites. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says over 50% of Hispanic men and women are expected to develop Type 2 diabetes in their lifetimes.


Edward Thompson https://bit.ly/2TdVl1Z

For many people, weight loss surgery is a health game changer. But a San Antonio researcher says some patients are running into an unexpected and underdiagnosed complication years after the surgery.

 

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The Bexar County Sheriff's office is launching a new safety awareness program to assist people with special needs when interacting with law enforcement or emergency responders.


Jessica A DuVernay/U.S. Army

Peripheral artery disease is a lesser-known chronic circulatory condition with potentially fatal consequences if left unchecked.


Ruben de Rijcke / Wikimedia Commons / Wiki Commons https://bit.ly/1RBU5g4

A particulate that chokes the air wherever you find cars has been linked to the development of Type II diabetes. The particulate is called PM 2.5.


Undiagnosed diabetes may not be as big of a public health problem as thought.

That's the takeaway from a study published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine that says that some previous efforts have likely overestimated the number of people with undiagnosed diabetes because they relied on a single positive test result.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

A new case study published in a national journal predicts that the implementation of a sweeping diabetes prevention program in San Antonio could save more than $400 million dollars in healthcare related costs over 20 years.

Diabetes is a huge problem in the Alamo City, impacting an estimated 14 percent of the population.

  

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

South Texas has more than its share of kidney disease. A high incidence of diabetes puts people at risk of renal failure. Heart procedures can threaten fragile kidney function, too. A new device is making heart repair safer for kidney patients.

Pages