detention centers | Texas Public Radio

detention centers

Laurie Cook Heffron, a licensed social worker and professor of Social Work at St. Edward’s University in Austin, is co-author of the study “Latina Immigrant Women and Children’s Well-Being and Access to Services after Detention” with licensed psychologist, Gabriela Hurtado and Josie Serrata of Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network for Health Families and Communities.

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From Texas Standard:

The border, the wall, the immigration issue – they're all front and center right now in Washington, as they have been almost every day of 2018.

From Texas Standard:

Over the weekend, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, began releasing large numbers of mostly Central American migrants from detention facilities in El Paso. The releases have continued, with the agency letting 500 migrants go Wednesday.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is proposing to lift court-imposed limits on how long it can hold children in immigration detention.

Torn Apart/Separados

On this episode of Fronteras, Roopika Risam, assistant professor of English and faculty fellow for digital library initiatives at Salem State University in Salem, Massachusetts, joins us to talk about the impact of the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy.


From Texas Standard.

In recent days we’ve been seeing a wave of protests at detention centers in South Texas over the Trump administration’s zero tolerance policy at the border, which has led to the separation of families. There are now signs that something’s changing. Case in point: the detention camp in Tornillo, outside El Paso.

From Texas Standard.

Reports last year show that immigrant detention centers in Texas, including the Karnes City and Dilley centers, were operating below capacity. Illegal border crossing arrests are at a 46-year low. There is one immigration-related statistic, though, that increased over the past year. A report by the Houston Chronicle and the nonprofit investigative organization Injustice Watch found that 2017 was the deadliest year since 2009 in immigrant detention facilities nationwide. Twelve detainees died in custody last year – and some of those deaths were deemed preventable.

Updated Dec. 15

Immigrants detained at four large centers used by Immigration and Customs Enforcement are subject to inhumane treatment, given insufficient hygiene supplies and medical care, and provided potentially unsafe food, according to a federal report.

From Texas Standard:

In the first months of his administration, President Donald Trump has made good on a campaign promise: to tighten immigration restrictions and crack down on immigrants living in the United States illegally. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, or ICE, has rounded up immigrants in raids across the country, creating a boom for private prisons — an industry that's a growing part of the Texas economy.

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