depression | Texas Public Radio

depression

COVID-19 has been a disruption of seismic proportions and it's taking a toll not only on peoples' physical health, but their mental well-being. 


It's normal for people to occasionally feel sad in response to life events or experiences, but being sad is not the same as having depression -- a serious but treatable mental illness that can have devastating effects if left undiagnosed and untreated.


Dominic Freeman

A medicine best known as a club drug has a record of relieving suicidal depression in hours. National Institutes of Health researcher Dr. Carlos Zarate has been studying ketamine for years, and he told those gathered at the UT Health San Antonio Brain Health Symposium on Mood Disorders it's a potential game changer for people who struggle with treatment resistant depression. 


Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Lorenzo Gomez is not a doctor, nor does he claim to be. The San Antonio tech industry advocate released his second book Tuesday, but it isn't about business or technology — it’s about mental health.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Two hundred and thirty five graduation certificates were served up with mashed potatoes and green beans at a local cafeteria Tuesday. It was the largest class of over-60s to graduate from the Senior Planet program in San Antonio. Courses teach computer basics, social media and connecting online. Classes try to tackle social isolation among seniors with internet skills.

Ryan "China" McCarney has played sports his entire life, but sometimes he has to force himself to show up on the field to play pick-up soccer with his friends.

"I'm dreading and I'm anticipating the worst. But I do it anyway. And then, it's a euphoric sensation when you're done with it because you end up having a great time," says McCarney.

"I lost more than 80 percent of my university friends," recalls Jagannath Lamichhane.

After silently struggling with depression for two decades, Lamichhane published an essay in Nepal Times about his mental illness. "I could have hid my problem — like millions of people around the world," he says, but "if we hide our mental health, it may remain a problem forever."

Most Americans who screen positive for depression don't receive treatment, a study finds, while most who did receive treatment don't appear to have the disorder.

From Texas Standard:

Editor's note: This story discusses details that may not be suitable for children.

Fifteen years ago this week, Andrea Yates – a mom from a Houston suburb – methodically and systematically drowned all five of her children. The kids ranged in age from six months to seven years old.

Can a traumatic event that happened to one of your grandparents be impacting you today, causing you anxiety - addiction - phobias - panic disorders?

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