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Death penalty

Update at 4:57 p.m. ET. Federal Court Halts Execution:

With just hours to go, a federal court has halted the execution of Texas inmate Robert Campbell.

The execution would have been the first since Oklahoma botched one in April.

The ruling has nothing to do with the drug shortage that's dominated the narrative over the death penalty in the country. Instead, Campbell's lawyers argued that the state knew that Campbell was intellectually disabled but did not let his defense team know that.

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The complication-laden execution of Clayton Lockett, an Oklahoma death-row inmate, last week had everyone from President Obama to the U.N. High Commission on Human Rights weighing in on the tragic and torturous event.

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Texas Matters: Even with state leadership that staunchly opposed the Affordable Care Act and did what they could to hold it up, Texas numbers look good. Also on this show: Texas loses against the EPA, implications of botched Oklahoma execution.

Texas third in number of ACA plans enrolled in

Death Penalty Fades As Hot-Button Issue

May 2, 2014

It's almost hard to remember how dominant an issue the death penalty was a generation ago.

Crime and drugs were the top issues for voters in 1994. Not coincidentally, support for the death penalty peaked that year, at 80 percent, according to Gallup polling.

Robert Patton, the chief of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, offered a detailed timeline on Thursday of the botched execution of Clayton D. Lockett.

Following a botched execution in Oklahoma, anti-death penalty groups and attorneys are once again calling on the Texas Department of Criminal Justice to provide full transparency in the state's execution process.

The botched execution of death row inmate Clayton Lockett on Tuesday in Oklahoma is sparking a reassessment of lethal injection.

The Supreme Court denied a stay of execution for convicted Texas killer Tommy Lynn Sells on Thursday.

As we've reported, Sells' attorneys have been arguing that he should not be executed before the state reveals the source of its execution drugs. A lower court agreed with Sells and then the U.S.Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit said his execution should proceed.

Update (3/28): The Associated Press is now reporting that the Texas Supreme Court has halted the court decision that ordered the state to disclose the name of the compounding pharmacy that makes the drug pentobarbital.

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