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cyber security

Digital Threats On 2020 Elections

Jan 11, 2020

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Updated at 10 a.m. Wednesday ET

Texas is the latest state to be hit with a cyberattack, with state officials confirming this week that computer systems in 22 municipalities have been infiltrated by hackers demanding a ransom. A mayor of one of those cities said the attackers are asking for $2.5 million to unlock the files.

Across the country, one in four cities reported being attacked by cybercriminals every hour.  That’s according to a 2016 survey, but attacks against cities have since risen. 

FBI IC3

Cyber criminals stole $7.45 billion over the last five years — that’s around the same amount as the entire state budget of Iowa. Complaints to the FBI increase each year, and Texas businesses and residents continue to be one of the most frequent victims.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

The Justice Department announced indictments against two Chinese nationals Thursday.

 

Zhu Hua and Zhang Shilong are suspected of stealing hundreds of gigabytes of research, intellectual property and technology from more than 45 companies and agencies in 12 countries on behalf of China’s Ministry of State Security, according to the indictment.

 

 

Americans are expected to spend $3.8 billion on Amazon's Echo Dot, Google's Home and other smart home devices this holiday season. And that figure doesn't include the even wider market of other Internet-connected devices.

From Texas Standard:

At a cybersecurity summit in New York this week, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen sounded an alarm about the dangers posed to the U.S. by cyber attacks.

Wikicommons | http://bit.ly/2JWINmS

An administrative judge fined The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center $4.3 million Monday. The fine is for violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

From Texas Standard:

We now know that Texas is among the states whose election systems were compromised by Russian hackers before the 2016 elections. The fear is that it will happen again in 2018. On Tuesday, outgoing NSA Chief and head of the military's Cyber Command, Michael Rogers, testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee that the administration had given Rogers' agency no orders related to preventing further Russian meddling. But some states are denying that interference occurred, or that it was successful.

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

Your morning commute is guided by invisible forces in the form of sensors, electronic traffic signs and lights. As complex traffic systems become more and more integrated, the potential for traffic-fueled calamity increases, say cyber security experts.


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