Cuba | Texas Public Radio

Cuba

Verónica G. Cárdenas for Texas Public Radio

More than 30,000 asylum seeking migrants have been returned to Mexico to await their day in immigration court — a process that can take months. This is part of the Trump administration’s Remain in Mexico policy. The program says vulnerable populations may be excluded from the program, but many migrants who are considered vulnerable populations, including LGBTQ asylum seekers, are still being sent back to Mexico.


Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Richard De La Font Agency, Inc.

A pianist with an amazing, varied career is coming to the Alamo City on Saturday. His name is Chucho Valdes and Arts San Antonio’s Jason Erle said his sound is sophisticated and exceptionally catchy.

Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

On Fronteras:

  • A 12-year-old Mexican-American boy who was shot and killed by a Dallas police officer is honored with a public art project and documentary (0:21).
  • American writer, poet, and translator Margaret Randall joins us to discuss translating the collection “The Oval Portrait: Contemporary Cuban Women Writers and Artists” (4:55).
  • The University of Texas at San Antonio library has recently featured cookbooks created by housekeeping staff. Here’s why (14:21).

Mozart And 'The Peanut Vendor' In Havana

Jun 22, 2017

Last month, American pianist Simone Dinnerstein was in Cuba preparing for her current North American tour with an orchestra of young musicians from Havana. She fondly recalls one very hot rehearsal.

The time was right to revisit the Buena Vista Social Club. The blockbuster 1997 album and 1999 documentary, chronicling the recording sessions of an ad-hoc group of remarkable Cuban musicians, set off a global wave of appreciation for Son cubano music in the late '90s. The principal players, many of whom had begun their musical careers before the Communist revolution and had been retired for years before making the album, became overnight celebrities.

A UTSA quartet that went to Cuba to perform made a connection that went beyond performing. For the students and their professor, Matthew Dunne, music became the universal language.

The students spent a week in Havana, Cienfuegos and Pinar Del Rio, playing concerts in each. Besides their formal appearances, the group also played in several schools. Before performing for students though, the students would perform for them.

"A pretty emotional moment for me was seeing the kids play.”

From Texas Standard:

In the past year, Texas has seen a surge of Cuban immigrants crossing the border, hoping to take part in what’s known as the U.S. “wet foot/dry foot” policy – worried the policy would soon disappear with the government’s normalization of ties with Cuba.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to take a minute to consider how Castro influenced the country in one particular way - its music. To do that, we're joined by NPR contributor Betto Arcos. Betto, thanks so much for joining us.

Pages