conservation | Texas Public Radio

conservation

From Texas Standard:

It’s a clear, cool morning in West Texas, and about 50 people are watching a helicopter wind its way around the south side of Elephant Mountain – a brown, flat-topped summit about 30 miles south of Alpine. The sun isn’t all the way up yet, but you can tell that the helicopter is hauling some unusual cargo.

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

On the banks of the Llano River, just south of Junction, Texas, amongst the cactus and mesquite trees sits a house that researchers hope will change the face of conservation.


Texas Butterfly Ranch

Mexican officials calculated an increase in the monarch butterfly population early this year but overall, the population has declined by 90% since the 1990s. What are the greatest threats to monarchs' and their migratory journey? What does the drop say about the health and stability of our ecosystem?


From Texas Standard

Wimberley Independent School District in Central Texas is moving forward with the construction of a new environmentally friendly school. The project focuses on the conservation of water.

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor map released Thursday, most of Texas is completely drought-free. That's a stark change from where the state was this time last year, let alone the extreme drought conditions of years past. But even as drought pressure has abated, water remains both a valuable and scarce resource in Texas, making it significant that this Hill Country elementary school is being constructed as the most water-efficient in the state.

Nick Dornak is the director of Watershed Services at Texas State University's Meadows Center. He says the school will be the first “one water” school in the state, incorporating water and wastewater treatment directly into the building.

Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

“We are looking at starting the summer months, in the Hill Country, with only five inches of rain,” Katherine Romans, Executive Director of the Hill Country Alliance, explained during the opening of the most recent Texas Water Symposium on Wednesday, May 30. As the Hill Country continues to grow at unprecedented rates, the demands on limited water resources will increasingly outpace the current supply.

State of Louisiana

Many drought-stricken Texas cities have long searched for alternative sources of water, including asking neighboring states for help.  Now, Louisiana has approved a measure to begin studying that very idea.


From Texas Standard:

Texas A&M–Corpus Christi is going from the Gulf Stream to the TV screen.

The coastal university will be featured on the  "Shark Week" television series Wednesday, displaying artificial reefs for the Gulf Coast that are designed to attract wildlife in areas where the ocean floor is largely made up of mud or sand.

Texas coal mining, the spread of fire ants, the growth of light pollution, the shrinking migration of monarch butterflies, the reduction of Hill Country springs, sprawl of cities and colonias in Texas. They all add up to a raft of massive environmental challenge for the Lone Star State and included in the book “The Texas Landscape Project: Nature and People.”

U.S. Fish And Wildlife | http://1.usa.gov/1TXEaqe

The Source: America's Obsession With Lawns

Aug 31, 2015
WikiCommons http://bit.ly/1KA5w4Q

Thanks to Leave It To Beaver and The Brady Bunch, golf courses and baseball fields, green lawns are a keystone of the American cultural psyche. Paul Robbins, director of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, asks how the US fell so deeply in love with green lawns. In his new book, Lawn People, he explores the impact and toll of that interesting relationship. 

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