Confederate history | Texas Public Radio

Confederate history

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

On Monday, State Senator Brandon Creighton rose on the Senate floor to present his bill SB 1663. He is proposing a stringent process for the removal or alteration of historic monuments in Texas.

Sen. Creighton:

Our historical monuments tell the story of Texas. Our history is part of who we are, part of the story of Texas, but history is never just one person's account.

What followed was a four-hour debate on the Senate floor that was passionate and sometimes personal. 

A plaque that has been displayed in the halls of the Texas State Capitol building for decades could be removed because it contains the “Children of the Confederacy Creed,” which falsely claims that slavery was not a cause of the Civil War. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Ben Philpott (@BenPhilpottKUT), senior editor at KUT in Austin.

This story is part of American Anthem, a yearlong series on songs that rouse, unite, celebrate and call to action. Find more at NPR.org/Anthem.

Van Turner has a secret: He knows the whereabouts of the controversial Confederate statues removed last year from two parks in Memphis, Tenn.

"They have to be kept in a secretive location," said Turner on a recent afternoon, standing in a park overlooking the Mississippi River where one of the statues — of Confederate President Jefferson Davis — once stood. "For fear of someone trying to go in and get them."

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Last year, after a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville turned violent, dozens of Confederate monuments came down, one by protesters in Durham, N.C...

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED CROWD: (Chanting) No KKK, no fascist USA.

Updated at 3:55 p.m. ET

Just weeks before last year's "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va., Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney announced a new commission to recommend "how to best tell the real story" of the Confederate-era and other statues on Monument Avenue, a tree-lined street known as one of the city's tourist destinations.

Then the white nationalists gathered in Charlottesville, some 70 miles away. They rallied around a statue of Robert E. Lee that had been slated for removal during an August weekend that turned violent.

Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

Just up Interstate 10, about 50 miles northwest of San Antonio, stands a monument in a small town that's unlike any monument in Texas.

 


The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to take up a case challenging the use of a Confederate emblem on the Mississippi state flag.

Carlos Moore, an African-American lawyer from Mississippi who petitioned the court, had argued in court documents that the flag, visible in state buildings, courts and schools, symbolically expresses support for white supremacy. The flag incorporates the Confederate battle flag in its upper left corner.

David Martin Davies

No 'fake news' in a wild week with fighting energy commissioners, and a $51,000 bill for an online psychic

Editor's note: Mike Ward, who appeared on this podcast, was a reporter for the Houston Chronicle whose reporting was called into question in August, 2018. Although the podcasts were primarily analysis of current events, in the interest of disclosure, we thought it wise to include this information. 

From Texas Standard:

After weeks of legal and logistical wrangling, a statue of Confederate leader Robert E. Lee that had been in Dallas' Oak Lawn neighborhood for 81 years, was removed Thursday night. Meanwhile, State Rep. Eric Johnson (D-Dallas) will meet with Gov. Greg Abbott to discuss removing or altering Confederate monuments and plaques on the Capitol grounds.

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