Confederacy | Texas Public Radio

Confederacy

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

On Monday, State Senator Brandon Creighton rose on the Senate floor to present his bill SB 1663. He is proposing a stringent process for the removal or alteration of historic monuments in Texas.

Sen. Creighton:

Our historical monuments tell the story of Texas. Our history is part of who we are, part of the story of Texas, but history is never just one person's account.

What followed was a four-hour debate on the Senate floor that was passionate and sometimes personal. 

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

In the heart of one of San Antonio’s oldest parks is a towering Confederate Monument erected thirty years after the civil war. Most visitors to Travis Park only pay passing attention to it, but in the last two years the 40 foot structure has become the subject of scrutiny as the people across the United States question the meaning of confederate landmarks. At least two council people would like to see the monument moved to a museum and community support may be growing.

Texas joined the Confederacy on March 2, 1861.  About 70,000 men from Texas then joined the rebellious fight to preserve slavery. The women who stayed behind also did their part for the lost southern cause. 

Virginia Alvino / Texas Public Radio News

Northeast ISD voted Monday night not to change the name of Robert E. Lee High School.

Since the racially-motivated mass shooting in South Carolina, institutions across the country have considered removing Confederate symbols.

For NEISD, the emotional discussion has endured for months, with thousands of people for and against the change signing petitions and making public comments.

One attendee of Monday’s school board meeting was Lee alumni Connie Strahan Stipp, who opposes changing the name of the school.