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College

San Antonio high school seniors committed to attending Texas A&M-San Antonio cheer on their mascot during a dance off on College Signing Day May 3, 2019.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

More than a thousand high school seniors from across San Antonio pledged to continue their education after graduation Friday.


Wikipedia Commons

Salma Paredes, a senior at Arlington Collegiate High School, enjoys graphic design, watching documentaries and hanging out with friends — when she has the time. She’s typically busy taking college courses and planning her future. She will graduate from high school this spring with 60 college credits, the equivalent of an associate’s degree, or half of a bachelor’s degree.

The sunrise in rural central Michigan reveals a landscape of neatly divided cornfields crossed by ditches and wooded creeks. But few of the sleepy teenagers on the school bus from Maple Valley Junior-Senior High School likely noticed this scene on their hour drive to Grand Rapids.

They set out from their tiny school district of about 1,000 students, heading to the closest big city for a college recruiting fair. About 151 colleges and universities were waiting.

From Texas Standard:

College has become a prerequisite for most high-paying jobs in the U.S., but college itself is out of reach for millions, and that number is growing. And the Federal Reserve Bank of New York says that in the past 10 years, student loan debt has grown by more than 100 percent. People ages 19 to 29 hold more than $1 trillion in student debt, and that's just the Millennial generation. With a wide-open Democratic primary field, it's almost certain that college affordability will be an issue during the 2020 presidential campaign.

Adam Harris writes in The Atlantic that the current crop of Democratic presidential candidates have focused their attention on how to make college affordable in the future,  proposing free college tuition or policies that would allow students to leave school without debt.

Harris says that prior to the 2016 election, momentum had been building nationally for some sort of free college program. But once Donald Trump was elected president, that momentum shifted to the states.

TEXAS grants are awarded to students  with financial need attending public universities like UTSA.
File Photo |Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

As the number of students eligible for the state’s largest financial aid program grows, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board is projecting a substantial drop in the percentage of eligible students who will receive the award.

Initial budget proposals filed in the Texas House and Senate this week keep funding flat for the Toward EXcellence, Access, & Success (TEXAS) Grant Program.


Students pick up transcripts at the Ingram campus of Brightwood College San Antonio after learning their school was closing Dec. 5 2018.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Updated 9 p.m.

Students at Brightwood College in San Antonio were told Wednesday that their school was closing effective immediately.

UTSA freshman Aylin Esparza makes the bed in her new dorm room with her mom, Patricia Sanchez August 17, 2018.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

On the fourth floor of Alvarez Hall Friday, Aylin Esparza and her mom, Patricia Sanchez, unpacked a box of sheets to make her bed.

The 18 year old freshman has never lived away from her home in Dallas, and she’s hoping her new neighbors will become something of a second family while she’s at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Stethoscope
"Tools of the Trade" | Weixiang Ng / Flickr | http://bit.ly/2AIa8JA

Baptist Health Foundation of San Antonio is partnering with Tenet Healthcare to award $2 million in scholarships to area college students pursuing careers in health care.

Pexels CC0 http://bit.ly/2v0Ma5S

As many as one-third of high-school graduates apply to college, are accepted and plan to enroll, but don't end up in class or enrolled in a post-secondary education program.

This so called "summer melt" phenomenon is attributed to various challenges and a lack of continued support, and is more common for students from lower-economic households and those who are the first in their family to attend college.

From Texas Standard.

Tulia is an agricultural hamlet of 5,000 souls in the middle of the Texas Panhandle, just under an hour south of Amarillo. It’s where 18-year-old Tawnee Flowers grew up and went to high school.

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