Classical | Texas Public Radio

Classical

Texas Public Radio Classical Music blog and other stories.

Sometimes old recipes, newly tweaked, can yield astonishing results. Consider the concerto: It might be a 400-year-old formula, calling for a soloist to perform with — and often battle against — an orchestra. But occasionally, a brand new concerto arrives that offers old-fashioned thrills.

In a sharp turn from the public apology he issued two days ago, opera star Plácido Domingo offered a new statement on Thursday regarding allegations of sexual misconduct against him.

Bonnie Petrie | Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Symphony will perform Hollywood Hits this Friday at the Tobin Center. Before they do, they’ll perform the show for a special crowd: people with dementia and their caregivers. 

It’s part of the Memory and Music program at the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Diseases. The Symphony and the Tobin Center welcome those with dementia and their caregivers to certain rehearsals so they can enjoy the music in an environment more suited to their needs.


Updated at 6:00 p.m. ET

The union representing opera performers, choral singers and dancers says that according to an independent investigation it commissioned, opera megastar Plácido Domingo engaged in "inappropriate activity" with women both "in and outside of the workplace."

This year marks the 250th birthday of one of the most revered composers who ever lived: Ludwig van Beethoven, who was born in Bonn, Germany, in 1770. Beethoven wrote hundreds of piano sonatas, overtures and chamber pieces, but truly made his mark with his nine symphonies.

Oscar Moreno

Middle and high school students from across the KPAC listening area brought their talents to McAllister Auditorium on January 25, 2020 for the sixth annual SOUNDS LIKE KPAC competition, featuring solo and ensemble performances, plus a juried art show, and written word entries for everyone in attendance to read, all inspired by the classical music heard on Texas Public Radio’s KPAC 88.3 FM.

As doctors in London performed surgery on Dagmar Turner's brain, the sound of a violin filled the operating room.

The music came from the patient on the operating table. In a video from the surgery, the violinist moves her bow up and down as surgeons behind a plastic sheet work to remove her brain tumor.

How can one mourn a parent whose harsh judgments frame childhood? This question haunts Philip Kennicott's Counterpoint: A Memoir of Bach and Mourning.

This August will mark 100 years since women won the right to vote with the ratification of the 19th Amendment. To celebrate, the New York Philharmonic has commissioned compositions by 19 women for an initiative it calls Project 19, which had its first concert earlier this month.

Jack Morgan

This weekend, you can learn more about unique Chicano art. You can rediscover Romeo and Juliet. And then you enjoy an elegant and creative take on baroque music.  


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