Civil War | Texas Public Radio

Civil War

The Schreiner University Department of History is honoring the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War with a series of short vignettes, focusing on events from 1861 through 1865.  The Civil War was the most destructive conflict in American history, but it was also one of our most defining moments as a people and as a nation.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

On Monday, State Senator Brandon Creighton rose on the Senate floor to present his bill SB 1663. He is proposing a stringent process for the removal or alteration of historic monuments in Texas.

Sen. Creighton:

Our historical monuments tell the story of Texas. Our history is part of who we are, part of the story of Texas, but history is never just one person's account.

What followed was a four-hour debate on the Senate floor that was passionate and sometimes personal. 

Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

Just up Interstate 10, about 50 miles northwest of San Antonio, stands a monument in a small town that's unlike any monument in Texas.

 


Pixabay (Public Domain)

On this episode of "Texas Matters," we look at:

  • Politics in the classroom
  • Sam Houston’s Last Days (12:06)


Author Ben H. Winters‘ best-selling 2016 novel “Underground Airlines” is set in present day, but in an America where Abraham Lincoln never took office and slavery is legal in four states.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti revisits a conversation with Winters from last July about the novel, which is out in paperback on July 18, and the difficulties that he had as a white author dealing with such a racially charged topic.

Workers removed another high-profile Confederate monument in New Orleans overnight, lifting a statue of Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard on horseback from its spot at the entrance of City Park. One more statue remains to be taken down, of Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Bleeding Kansas is well known for the violence in the years running up to the Civil War. Here we had the The Texas Troubles. 

Texas joined the Confederacy on March 2, 1861.  About 70,000 men from Texas then joined the rebellious fight to preserve slavery. The women who stayed behind also did their part for the lost southern cause. 

When the opera Appomattox premiered in 2007, it put on stage a piece of history that was more than 140 years old.

But creators Philip Glass and Christopher Hampton recently decided the story wasn't over.

When the Washington National Opera wanted to stage the opera, Glass said it needed a rewrite — to reflect what's happened in the U.S. since the premiere.

"In the last seven or eight years there have been profound and really horrific changes in the way this country understands itself," Glass says.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The debate over flying the Confederate flag has moved to a private cemetery near certain African-American neighborhoods in San Antonio. The Confederate Cemetery on the city’s Eastside is the burial site for hundreds of soldiers who fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War and the debate is over whether the cemetery flag should come down. 

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