choral music | Texas Public Radio

choral music

Logic Allah

The weekend is here, and if you’re looking for some arts and culture ideas, you’ve come to the right place. You can catch a documentary on the Black experience and influences in San Antonio, hear a great classical music collaboration, and watch a Broadway musical about the Sept. 11 attacks.

 


Every Christmas Eve at exactly 3 p.m., the Chapel of King's College in Cambridge, England plays A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols. The tradition began in 1918, and for decades it's been broadcast on the BBC and around the world. A commemorative recording of last year's Centenary Service has just been released; it was the last one conducted by Sir Stephen Cleobury, the choir's music director for 37 years, who died just last month on Nov. 22.

Tenor David Portillo took his talent from Holmes High School on San Antonio’s west side all the way to the Metropolitan Opera in New York City. Now, he’s coming back to town with YouthCUE, a nationwide effort to positively impact kids through the power of choral music.

Most people love to sing, but in Estonia, they take their singing very seriously. At the Estonian Song Festivals, for example, over 30 thousand singers routinely show up to form one gigantic chorus. Among the Baltic country's smaller, professional vocal ensembles, the Grammy-winning Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir is considered one of the world's best. When the group releases a new album, fans of choral music listen up.

James Goulden

An Austin-based choral group is planning their San Antonio Christmas performance.  The group is Conspirare, and their Art Director, Craig Hella Johnson, describes the group this way:

"A musical family of singers who come from all over the country. From New York and Minneapolis and Seattle and some small places in between, and certainly we have some in Austin also."

Yesterday in New York, something very big happened outside Lincoln Center: One thousand people gathered to sing a new piece by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer David Lang. Entitled the public domain, it was a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Mostly Mozart festival.

Trish Neil

 

There are lots of opportunities for kids to express themselves musically in South Texas, but the Texas Children’s Choir places equal emphasis on something that parents may value as much as the discipline music studies bring—service. They’ve sung at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., at Carnegie Hall, and have provided music for military celebrations and ceremonies far and wide, including the 70th anniversary of D-Day in France.

Sir David Willcocks died at his home in Cambridge, England on Sept. 17 at the age of 95. A conductor, organist, composer and arranger, Sir David was the music director of music at King’s College, Cambridge, for 17 years and spent 38 years as head of the Bach Choir.

He also worked with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir as well and the Rolling Stones. Sir David won a Grammy Award and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth for his contributions to the world of music.

Jack Morgan / TPR

Matisse ends his run at SAMA, but he’s not going away quietly. Rather than let him just slink away, they're throwing a goodbye party.

“The evening is entitled 'au revoir, Matisse,' ” said Ruth Moreland, music director of the Copperleaf Quintet. "And there’ll be all kinds of wonderful things going on at the museum, and Copperleaf will be performing a concert of French salon music in the third floor exhibition gallery, which is where they have all of Matisse’s art books.”

San Antonio Mastersingers

It’s not "The Voice" or "American Idol," but there are some vocal tryouts coming soon. No, you can’t expect to be dissed by tattoo’d rock stars, but you just might get to travel internationally if you pass the audition.

“We are looking for all kinds of singers, all kinds of voice parts," said Chancey Blackburn, the vice-chair of the San Antonio Mastersingers. "The chorus is made up of singers who have been masters of music performance, all the way to singers like me, with no formal training.”

I asked her what someone who is thinking of coming to try out can expect.

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