Broadway | Texas Public Radio

Broadway

After much debate, public input and several different iterations, city officials say the Broadway corridor redesign plan is nearing completion.

  

The improvements are part of a $850 million municipal bond package approved by San Antonio voters in 2017, to make lower Broadway a safe multimodal area. The plan's latest iteration was revealed in June and does not require city council approval.

This story is part of American Anthem, a yearlong series on songs that rouse, unite, celebrate and call to action. Find more at NPR.org/Anthem.


George M. Cohan was 64, and had just a few weeks to live, when producers showed him the movie they'd made about his astonishingly productive life.

Emily Navaira

Live music and culture dominate the coming weekend.


Courtesy Centro San Antonio http://bit.ly/2nJ9ODq

Development on Broadway Street between Downtown and Alamo Heights continues to transform a major part of the city.

Alfredo Valente / Wikimedia commons

In 2003 and 2004, Texas Public Radio’s James Baker and Kathy Couser produced a multi-part series on the art of the American Popular Song, focusing on great composers and lyricists like George & Ira Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Harold Arlen, and Rodgers & Hammerstein. Exhaustively researched and exquisitely produced, the shows were only broadcast once.

Joan Marcus

A Broadway hit musical finds its way to the Majestic Theatre. Two of its principle players, Ben Fankhauser and Erika Olson, who play the songwriting team Mann and Weil, offered some insight into the show. 

"This is the point in our music history where all the pop music was written in office buildings by a small group of composers. There was a lot of competition because this was before the singer/songwriter era," says Fankhauser.

Joan Marcus

It's been a Broadway smash for years, and now it's back in San Antonio. One of the production's stars is, no surprise, really impressed with the production. He's Billy Tighe, and he thinks The Book of Mormon's magic all started with those who wrote it, because they saw something in a highly unlikely subject.

"The creators of South Park and Bobby Lopez were endlessly fascinated by it and knew there was a well of  comedy in there," says Tighe. 

This Friday we go on stage, the ultimate stage perhaps, Broadway. January and February are usually considered the “zombie months” on Broadway, says New York Times theater critic Ben Brantley. However, this season is a “surprisingly good one,” he tells Here & Now’s Robin Young. Even better, tickets are still available for some of Brantley’s favorite shows this winter. He shares his four top picks.

Ben Brantley’s 4 Broadway Picks

1. Constellations

Jeremy Daniel

A musical started on Broadway, went to Hollywood and finally traveled all over the world. Now it’s coming to San Antonio and I was able to speak to one of its stars.

“My name is Roz Ryan!”

Roz stars in a key role in a production you’ve surely heard of.

“We’re coming with Chicago, the Musical, which is a pretty awesome show that I’ve been in-and-out-of for about 15 years.”

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