Border Wall | Texas Public Radio

Border Wall

The bidding process to design and construct a wall along the length of the U.S.-Mexico border is expected to begin soon. The government wants a 30-foot barrier made of precast concrete that is resistant to tampering and climbing.

The public radio show Reveal has mapped the entire 2,000-mile border and found that about 650 miles already have some sort of barrier in place, including about 55 miles of fencing throughout the Rio Grande Valley in Southeast Texas.

From Texas Standard:

The United States Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection unit says it will begin soliciting proposals from companies interested in constructing President Donald Trump's proposed border wall along the U.S.-Mexico divide.

The federal government posted a pre-solicitation this week and has already garnered hundreds of responses – dozens from Texas alone – for what promises to be one of the biggest contracts of any infrastructure project planned by the Trump administration.

From Texas Standard: 

President Donald Trump's proposed border wall expansion could mean many more legal cases regarding how landowners should be compensated for the government condemning their property to house parts of the barrier.

The proposed border wall between the U.S. and Mexico would run right through Native lands, and tribal leaders in the region say it would desecrate sacred sites.

"Over my dead body will we build a wall," says Verlon Jose, vice chairman of the Tohono O'odham Nation. "It's like me going into your home and saying 'You know what? I believe in order to protect your house we need some adjusting.' And you're going to say, 'Wait a minute, who are you to come into my house and tell me how to protect my home?' " he says.

On Jan. 25, President Trump signed an executive order instructing construction to begin on a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Environmentalists and civil rights activists say the proposed wall on the southern border with Mexico is a threat to the environmental rights of the people who live on both sides of the border.

President Trump has been promising to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border to prevent illegal immigration into the United States. But biologists say it could harm animals like the Mexican gray wolf, mountain lions and jaguars that roam freely across the border.

David Martin Davies

In his first week in the Oval Office President Donald Trump fast-tracked his main campaign promise - the Border Wall. At a May 2016 campaign stop in Phoenix Trump joined the crowd in the chant "Build that wall."

Now that Trump has won the electoral college and became President, he’s moving forward with building that wall. On Wednesday he signed executive orders to begin construction of the Wall and called for a newly expanded deportation force to arrest, detain and expel unauthorized immigrants with criminal records.

The Logistics of Building Trump's Border Wall

Jan 26, 2017

From Texas Standard:

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday authorizing the building of a wall along the United States-Mexico border.

He told ABC News that morning that the U.S. will start building the wall “as soon as we can. As soon as we can physically do it. … I would say in months. Certainly, planning is starting immediately.”

From the start of his campaign, after he descended the golden escalator to give his announcement speech, Donald Trump promised to build a wall along the U.S.' Southern border. Now, Trump is taking the first steps toward keeping that promise, with an executive action that calls for building that wall.

In line with his campaign theme of tightening laws on immigration, that action will call for other measures, such as hiring more Border Patrol agents and expanding detention space.

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