Border Wall | Texas Public Radio

Border Wall

From Texas Standard:

Our attention turns once again to the Texas side of the Rio Grande where President Donald Trump has doubled down on his plan build a wall along the border with Mexico. Over the weekend, Trump said he may declare a national emergency to secure the funding for the wall after White House officials and top legislative aids failed to reach a compromise about it, and also failed to end the partial government shutdown.

While politicians hash out immigration policy in Washington, McAllen Mayor Jim Darling deals with the day-to-day impact of immigration in the Rio Grande Valley – one of Texas' busiest border-crossing regions. Darling says he sees several hundred asylum seekers per day come to respite centers in the area. And while media have focused on the Central American migrant caravans moving through Mexico, he says they've missed what's actually happening at the border.

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

More troops are expected to be deployed to the Southern border to construct or upgrade 160 miles of fencing and provide medical care to a steady stream of migrant families arriving from Central America, according to military sources.

The deployment and fence construction along the California and Arizona borders would be paid for by the Pentagon, from the Department of Defense's discretionary funding.

Updated 3:55 pm E.T. Friday

The government shutdown began with the president's demand for border security money. But it has also halted E-Verify, a federal program that's supposed to prevent immigrants from working here illegally.

If U.S. employers want to check whether their prospective hires are eligible to work, they can't. The E-Verify database is "currently unavailable due to a lapse in government appropriations," according to a note on the government-run website.

President Trump launched his campaign in 2015 promising, "I will build a great, great wall on our southern border. And I will have Mexico pay for that wall. Mark my words."

Before long, supporters were chanting, "Build the wall!" and Trump was leading them in a call and response. Who will pay for the wall? Mexico.

He told rally-goers that a lot of politicians said it wouldn't be possible to get Mexico to pay for it. "It's going to be so easy; it's going to be so easy," Trump insisted at the time.

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Steve Hillebrand / US Fish And Wildlife Service

Democrats are divided over whether or not to negotiate with President Trump over funding his proposed border wall.


For the second time this week, President Donald Trump’s administration has announced its intent to proceed with parts of a new border barrier despite a lack of new funding from Congress to pay for his high-profile campaign promise.

From Texas Standard:

Were it not for the Kavanaugh confirmation spectacle, there may have been a very different fight on Capitol Hill over the last few weeks – and Texas would have been at the center of it. We're talking about President Donald Trump's promise to build a southern border wall.

David Martin Davies | Texas Public Radio

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has sent letters to 67 Rio Grande Valley landowners, requesting permission to survey their land as a possible site for a border wall. But congressional leaders believe that it could be decades before any work begins.


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This week on Fronteras:

  • Reaction to Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s decision to sue the federal government over ending DACA (0:15).
  • Vice President Mike Pence visits the border wall on the California-Mexico border (1:43).
  • The number of refugees resettling in Texas is declining (3.28).
  • Marfa mural preserves the city’s story for the future (9:10).
  • Author Bill Neeley shares the story of San Antonio Texas revolutionary hero Juan Seguín (12:38).


Carson Frame / Texas Public Radio

National Guard deployment continues along the Texas-Mexico Border. Gov. Greg Abbott has committed to eventually having 1,400 National Guard troops posted along the border. On Friday, officials on opposite ends of the state explained what Texans can expect next.

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